#FOWC — Don’t Take Him Literally

61D1BFFE-D81F-4C2F-9A81-743E046DD93DI heard her say, “You shouldn’t take Donald Trump literally.”

“So you’re saying that you can’t believe anything he says,” I responded.

“No, that’s not what I’m saying,” she said. “When he said Mexico will pay for the wall, for example, he meant it, but just not up-front and with cash. Mexico will ultimately pay for it through favorable trade deals he’ll negotiate with Mexico.”

“So you’re saying we should take him figuratively, but we should not take him seriously,” I said.

“You should take him seriously,” she said. “He’s a man of his word, but just not his literal words.”

“If you can’t take what he says literally, how can you say he’s a man of his word?” I asked. “That makes no sense. And you can’t take someone seriously when he constantly lies.”

“You liberals are always trying to take Trump literally and you keep claiming that he’s lying,” she said. “But he’s not lying. He’s just being symbolic.”

“Oh, you mean he’s expressing alternative facts, Kellyanne,” I said.

Just a Little Exaggeration

Do you ever exaggerate when telling a story or writing a post? Do you add an embellishment here or there for the sake of the narrative, to help your readers relate, or to gain their sympathy?

When someone exaggerates, they are representing something (or someone) as being larger, greater, better, or worse than it (or he or she) really is.

Don’t most good storytellers exaggerate a little? They embellish their tales, perhaps in order to heighten the story’s interest or to make the deeds described within seem just a bit more dramatic, heroic, or comedic.

And, of course, comedians make use of exaggeration, amplification, and hyperbole to enhance the humor of their jokes and funny stories.

An exaggeration occurs when the most fundamental aspects of a statement are true, but only to a certain degree. It’s just “stretching the truth” a little, right?

For example, when a mother scolds her child and says, “If I’ve told you once, I’ve told you a million times…” is that simply an exaggeration or is it a lie? After all, she may have told her kid that a lot, but certainly not a million times.

How about “I’m so hungry that I could eat a horse”? Or “You could have knocked me over with a feather”? Are these common idioms examples of exaggeration, hyperbole, or lies? Do we recognize and accept them because of how obvious it is that these are “exaggerations for effect”?

A fine line

But isn’t stretching the truth also lying and being dishonest? I think we can all agree that there is a fine line between exaggeration and lying. But if that’s the case, where does it fall and under what circumstances should it not be crossed?

I’ve heard some suggest that the difference between an exaggeration and a lie is that the former doesn’t cause any harm, whereas the latter does. Others say the difference between the two is that an exaggeration could be seen as a matter of interpretation of facts. A lie, though, is a deception with the intention to mislead.

It is, indeed, a slippery slope when trying to distinguish between a benign exaggeration and an outright lie.

As a blogger and a storyteller, what are your feelings about exaggeration? Do you equate adding embellishments to your posts to lying? When, if ever, is stretching the truth permissible?

One-Liner Wednesday — Don’t Shoot the Messenger

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“The further a society drifts from the truth, the more it will hate those who speak it.”

If you haven’t read George Orwell’s book, 1984, in a long, long time — or if you’ve never read it — now is the time to do so. It’s particularly relevant these days when alternative facts (aka, lies) are being presented as valid options for actual facts (aka, the truth) and when real news is called fake and fake news is called real.

When the message offers you the truth, don’t shoot the messenger.


This post is part of the One-Liner Wedesday prompt from Linda G. Hill.