Fandango’s Friday Flashback — July 19

Each Friday I will publish a post I wrote on this exact date in a previous year. I’ve had this blog for two years, so I have only 2017 and 2018 to draw from.

Wouldn’t you like to expose your newer readers to some of you earlier posts that they might never have seen? Or remind your long term followers of posts that they might not remember?

Why don’t you reach back into your own archives and highlight a post that you wrote on this very date in a previous year? You can repost your Friday Flashback post on your blog and pingback to this post. Or you can just write a comment below with a link to the post you selected.

If you’ve been blogging for less than a year, go ahead and choose a post that you previously published on this day (the 19th) of any month within the past year and link to that post in a comment.

It would be great if everyone who reads this post would scroll down to the comments and check out the posts that others provide links to.


I originally published this post on July 19, 2017 in response to a One-Liner Wednesday prompt from Linda G. Hill.

IMG_2370Have you ever taken the time to contemplate the meaning of life? I don’t do it very often because I’m still not sure life has any real meaning.

No, I’m not a nihilist. I’m just not someone who feels the need to seek out an answer to life’s true purpose or what my role in this world should be, other than to survive as long as I can and to make the most of my short existence on this planet.

Okay, maybe I am a bit of a nihilist.

But the other morning I was sitting at the kitchen table reading the morning paper and drinking my morning coffee and I found myself wondering about life, what it all means, and how I fit in. So I asked my wife, who was sitting across from me busily working on that day’s newspaper crossword puzzle, what she thought the meaning of life is. Without even bothering to look up she said, “Huh?”

“What is the meaning of life?” I asked again.

“I don’t know,” she said, clearly disinterested. “Why don’t you ask Siri?”

So I picked up my iPhone, pressed the home button and said, “Siri, what is the meaning of life?”

This was Siri’s one-line answer:

IMG_0908

That works for me!

Fandango’s Friday Flashback — July 12

Each Friday I will publish a post I wrote on this exact date in a previous year. I’ve had this blog for two years, so I have only 2017 and 2018 to draw from.

Wouldn’t you like to expose your newer readers to some of you earlier posts that they might never have seen? Or remind your long term followers of posts that they might not remember?

Why don’t you reach back into your own archives and highlight a post that you wrote on this very date in a previous year? You can repost your Friday Flashback post on your blog and pingback to this post. Or you can just write a comment below with a link to the post you selected.

If you’ve been blogging for less than a year, go ahead and choose a post that you previously published on this day (the 12th) of any month within the past year and link to that post in a comment.

It would be great if everyone who reads this post would scroll down to the comments and check out the posts that others provide links to.


I originally published this post on July 12, 2017 in response to a One-Liner Wednesday prompt from Linda G. Hill.

Self-Refection

Robert Burns

“O wad some Power the giftie gie us
To see oursels as ithers see us!”

The great Scottish poet, Robert Burns, made this astute observation in his poem, To a Louse.

Now I’m not a big fan of poetry, but back in high school English lit class, we did have to study some of the world’s great poets, including the aforementioned Robert Burns. Of all of his poems we read, one poem, and one particular line in that poem — the one I’ve quoted at the top of this post — stood out to me.

For a more contemporary interpretation of the quoted text, it essentially means, “It would be great if we could somehow have the gift of being able to see ourselves the way other people see us.”

We really can’t see ourselves as others see us, can we? We see ourselves through our own perspectives, our own perceptions, and our own reality. Few of us can understand how we really come across to those around us or to the world.

Wouldn’t it be nice if, even for just an hour or a day, we could know how others view us? I think that seeing ourselves as others see us would be a gift, but perhaps it would actually be a burden. No doubt, though, it would be illuminating.

Maybe you wouldn’t like what you see.

Maybe such a “gift” would cause you to only say and do things that would please others.

Maybe it’s better to stay true to yourself and behave in a way that is natural to you, as an individual, regardless of how you are viewed by others.

In the end, I suppose there’s nothing wrong with a little self-reflection.