The Big Lie

You may think his motives are noble, but he’s just regurgitating the same old Big Lie over and over again in his ill-conceived attempt to bring about a false sense of euphoria among his mostly brain dead supporters about his returning to office.

The whole foundation of the Big Lie is gnarly and quite rickety, and yet the majority of Republicans continue to polish his clearly rotten apple of an ego.

It’s truly beyond comprehension that so many have been duped by this madman.


Written for these daily prompts: The Daily Spur (noble), Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (regurgitate), Ragtag Daily Prompt (euphoria), Word of the Day Challenge (gnarl), Your Daily Word Prompt (rickety), and My Vivid Blog (apple).

Texas, WTF?

In Southlake, Texas, Gina Peddy, the Carroll Independent School District’s executive director of curriculum and instruction, advised teachers last week that if they have a book about the Holocaust in their classroom, they should also offer students access to a book from an “opposing” perspective.

What is an “opposing perspective” when it comes to the Holocaust? Would that be the Nazi perspective that the genocide of millions of European Jews during World War II was a good thing? Or would it be that the Holocaust was fake news and never actually happened?

Peddy, referring to a new Texas law that requires teachers to present multiple perspectives when discussing “widely debated and currently controversial” issues, told teachers to “make sure that if you have a book on the Holocaust, that you have one that has an opposing, that has other perspectives.”

“How do you oppose the Holocaust?” one teacher asked in response.

“Believe me,” Peddy said. “That’s come up.”

This new Texas law requires teachers to provide “balanced perspectives” not just during classroom instruction, but in the books that are available to students in class during free time.

One teacher said, “There are no children’s books that show the ‘opposing perspective’ of the Holocaust or the ‘opposing perspective’ of slavery. Are we supposed to get rid of all of the books on those subjects?”

But what can you expect from Texas, which now has the most restrictive abortion law in the nation. That law allows any private individual to sue abortion providers or those who aid or abet abortions in violation of the law. Successful litigants can collect at least $10,000. It basically makes bounty hunters out of “concerned citizens” who rat out anyone who in any way assists or aids a woman to have an abortion — even if the pregnancy is the result of rape or incest — after six weeks of her pregnancy. Most women don’t even know they’re pregnant within the first six weeks.

Seriously, Texas, WTF?

Who Won the Week — 10/3/2021

The idea behind Who Won the Week is to give you the opportunity to select who (or what) you think “won” this past week. Your selection can be anyone or anything — politicians, celebrities, athletes, authors, bloggers, your friends or family members, books, movies, TV shows, businesses, organizations, whatever.

I will be posting this prompt on Sunday mornings (my time). If you want to participate, write your own post designating who you think won the week and why you think they deserve your nod. Then link back to this post and tag you post with FWWTW.

My Who Won The Week pick for this week is the health of Americans living in blue (democratic leaning) states that voted for Biden in the 2020 presidential election.

According to an article published in the New York Times this past week, the political divide over vaccinations is so large that almost every reliably blue state now has a higher vaccination rate than almost every reliably red state.

Further, because the vaccines are so effective at preventing serious illness, Covid deaths are also showing a partisan pattern. Covid is still a national crisis, but the worst forms of it are increasingly concentrated in red America.

And when you get even more granular, in counties where Donald Trump won at least 70 percent of the vote in the 2020 election, Covid-19 has killed about 47 out of every 100,000 people since the end of June. In counties where Trump won less than 32 percent of the vote, the Covid death rate is about 10 out of 100,000.

I wonder what lesson we can learn from this.

What about you? Who (or what) do you think won the week?

Fandango’s Flashback Friday — October 1st

Wouldn’t you like to expose your newer readers to some of your earlier posts that they might never have seen? Or remind your long term followers of posts that they might not remember? Each Friday I will publish a post I wrote on this exact date in a previous year.

How about you? Why don’t you reach back into your own archives and highlight a post that you wrote on this very date in a previous year? You can repost your Friday Flashback post on your blog and pingback to this post. Or you can just write a comment below with a link to the post you selected.

If you’ve been blogging for less than a year, go ahead and choose a post that you previously published on this day (the 1st) of any month within the past year and link to that post in a comment.


This was originally posted on October 1, 2018. Politically, not much has changed since then.

Democrats and Republicans

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Groucho Marx once said, “All people are born alike — except Republicans and Democrats.”

Unfortunately, what Groucho said decades ago is even more true today. The partisan divide is at an extreme like I have personally never experienced — and I lived through the Vietnam era, when this country was very politically divided.

We all share stereotypical views of those on the other side of the aisle. For example, if someone you’d never met learned that you were a Republican, they would likely assume that you are not black, lesbian, gay, transgender, bisexual, nonreligious, or Jewish. If they learned you were a Democrat, they would likely believe that you are not a white evangelical Christian and you don’t live in a rural part of the county.

Most Democrats are left-leaning, liberal, and are usually associated with progressiveness and equality. Most Republicans are right-leaning, conservative, and are associated with big business, economic freedom, and with self-reliance. But to be fair, “most” doesn’t mean “all.” There are plenty of crossovers, like me, a social liberal and a fiscal conservative.

I consider political party affiliation to be like religion. When babies are born, they have no religion. But they are taught about religion from their parents and most children embrace the religious beliefs of their families and maintain those beliefs into and throughout adulthood.

Similarly, babies are not born either Democratic or Republican. But they will typically embrace and follow the political leanings of their families.

My question is what has happened to moderates within either political party? These days moderates are ridiculed as being either RINOs or DINOs (i.e., Republicans/Democrats In Name Only) and of being disloyal to their party (even when being loyal to their party is being disloyal to their country). Political compromise and a willingness to negotiate with the other side are considered signs of weakness.

It’s a sad state of affairs when the primary purpose of a political party is to do everything it can to stymie the other party, thus effectively blocking the government from getting much of anything done. For anybody.