Donald Doesn’t Like What He Sees On Google

E5BE65B6-2887-4F0C-B50A-37CEE5EE9CB5Poor Donald Trump. He doesn’t like what he sees when he Googles himself. So what is the big baby going to do? He’s sending out Larry Kudlow, Director of the National Economic Council and his chief economic adviser, to “take a look” at whether Google and its search engine should be regulated by the government.

It’s not surprising, since our President gets all of his daily briefings from Fox News, that Trump’s tweets about Google being biased against him came the morning after Fox Business host Lou Dobbs aired an interview with pro-Trump commentators Lynnette Hardaway and Rochelle Richardson, popularly known as “Diamond and Silk.” They have long claimed that their online videos are being suppressed by tech companies like Google because of their conservative views and support for Trump.

Poor Donald. He can’t handle the truth.C1B4F733-2D3F-4547-AD77-608AB32449FE

“Truth Isn’t Truth”

Rudy GiulianiWhen asked on “Meet the Press” today about whether Donald Trump would agree to meet with Robert Mueller, Trump’s TV lawyer, Rudy Guilinai, said, “Look, I am not going to be rushed into having him testify so that he gets trapped into perjury. And when you tell me that, you know, he should testify because he’s going to tell the truth and he shouldn’t worry, well that’s so silly because it’s somebody’s version of the truth. Not the truth.”

“Truth is truth,” Chuck Todd, host of “Meet the Press,” responded.

“No, it isn’t truth,” Giuliani said. “Truth isn’t truth.”

Wow. “Truth isn’t truth” has got to be the best sound bite since Kellyanne Conway’s “alternative facts” comment, which she also let fly during an interview with Chuck Todd on “Meet the Press.”

“Truth isn’t truth?” Todd replied, adding, “This is going to become a bad meme.”

Song Lyric Sunday — Gimme Some Truth

This week’s Song Lyric Sunday prompt from Helen Vahdati is all about “truth.”

“Gimme Some Truth” is a protest song written and performed by John Lennon. It was written in 1969 and first released on his 1971 album Imagine. It contains various political references to the Vietnam War.

The song expresses Lennon’s frustration with deceptive politicians, and the hypocrisy and chauvinism of politics. It also reflects some widely held feelings of the time, when many people were participating in protest rallies against the war and the government.

Lennon referred to president Richard Nixon as “Tricky-Dicky,” a nickname that became popular during the Watergate hearings. There are many lyrical references to politicians as deceiving, slick, and cowardly characters.

No doubt, if he were alive today, Lennon would be able to express similar sentiments about today’s politics and politicians.

Here are the lyrics.

I’m sick and tired of hearing things from
Uptight short sided narrow minded hypocritics
All I want is the truth, just give me some truth
I’ve had enough of reading things
By neurotic psychotic pigheaded politicians
All I want is the truth, just give me some truth

No short-haired, yellow-bellied
Son of tricky dicky’s
Gonna mother hubbard soft soap me
With just a pocket full of hopes
Money for dope, money for rope

No short-haired, yellow-bellied,
Son of tricky dicky’s
Gonna mother hubbard soft soap me
With just a pocket full of hopes
Money for dope, money for rope

I’m sick to death of seeing things from
Tight-lipped condescending mama’s little chauvinists
All I want is the truth, just give me some truth
I’ve had enough of watching scenes from
Schizophrenic egocentric paranoiac primadonnas
All I want is the truth just give me some truth

No short-haired, yellow-bellied,
Son of tricky dicky’s
Gonna mother hubbard soft soap me
With just a pocket full of hopes
It’s money for dope, money for rope

I’m sick to death of hearing things from
Uptight short sided narrow minded hypocritics
All I want is the truth, just give me some truth
I’ve had enough of reading things
By neurotic psychotic pigheaded politicians
All I want is the truth, just give me some truth
All I want is the truth, just give me some truth
All I want is the truth, just give me some truth

The Legend of All Legends

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The Christian Bible was written over the course of 1,600 years by about 40 different authors on three different continents. This unique collection of stories serves as the foundation for the world’s largest religion, Christianity.

Every word of the Bible has been studied and parsed. The book has been weaponized and wars have been fought over it. Non-believers in the “truth” of the Bible have been persecuted and killed. It has been questioned and ridiculed as much as it has been revered and prized.

So is the Bible a factual accounting of the creation of everything by an omnipotent being, or is it a book of legends and myths, no different from the legend of King Arthur or the mythologies of the pre-Christianity gods?

To me, the Bible is an interesting, sometimes fascinating, book of fables and parables. But it’s not a text book, a history book, or a science book. Too much of the Bible is simply unbelievable to my practical, pragmatic mind.

Many of the “facts” in the Bible are simply wrong or are scientifically impossible. For example, according to Genesis, the universe is just over 6000 years old. We know that is not true.

Or take the tale of Joshua stopping the sun moving across the sky. This story assumes that the earth was flat and was at the center of the universe. And for the sun to stop, the earth would have to cease rotating on its axis, which would destroy the planet. We know these stories, and many other biblical stories, to be false.

Further, the Bible is full of inconsistencies. How can it be an accurate historical record, when the various books of the Bible contradict one another?

We also know that other world religions also contain rich histories of mythology and fantastical sounding stories, many of which stories are similar to those found in the Bible.

I have no quarrel with those for whom the Bible brings solace and comfort and serves as the anchor for their spiritual and religious beliefs. I would hope that they have no quarrel with me for believing that the Bible is simply a book of legends.


Written for today’s one-word prompt, “legend.”

 

One-Liner Wednesday — Dangerous Ground

“A society is moving toward dangerous ground when loyalty to the truth is seen as disloyalty to some supposedly higher interest.”

This quote is attributed to American novelist and essayist Marilynne Robinson.

I think the Republicans in Congress should take heed, as they are definitely treading on dangerous ground. Especially now that indictments are being issued.


Written for today’s One-Liner Wednesday prompt from Linda G. Hill.