Share Your World — About Life, Death, Beauty, Morality, and Perfection

SYWMonday means Melanie’s Share Your World prompt. Today our host has become quite philosophical in her questions. She wants us to talk about the living and the dead, about beauty and morality, about technology and emotions, and about perfection and gratitude. A tall order, indeed!

Anyway, let’s do this!

Why do we seem to respect the dead more than the living?

I don’t respect the dead more than the living. I respect what people accomplish (or accomplished) and the manner in which they live (or lived) their lives, living or dead.10F97ABA-FC27-4699-9CD7-4A7C3A826D3A

Why is beauty associated with morality?  Or not?   (a few weeks back I asked a similar question, but the key word was MORTALITY, not MORALITY).

I hate to be argumentative today, but I don’t associate beauty with morality. Physical beauty has more to do with appearance than with positive actions or good deeds. In fact, so-called “beautiful people” often have advantages in life not available to those whose appearances are less attractive and, therefore, may be less empathetic. So, in my opinion, beauty and morality are unrelated. 

Have gadgets and apps taken away emotions?

Huh? What do gadgets have to do with emotions? As to apps, I think that social media apps, especially Twitter, have intensified emotions, as people who use those apps tend to feel freer to express strong, especially negative, emotions as they hide behind the anonymity and the distance those types of apps provide. These social media apps have also reduced face-to-face human interactions to a great extent.48F6CE61-0B8C-4D5D-8A7E-A5DD7F646B01

Is there a perfect life? What’s your version of a perfect life if you care to share?

For something to be perfect it must be free from flaws or faults. Life doesn’t work that way. No person is perfect; no life is perfect. True perfection is an unrealistic goal and attempting to achieve a perfect life can only set one up for disappointment and frustration.

If you’d like, please share something uplifting or for which you are grateful.

I’m grateful for this perfect life that I am leading. 😏

SoCS — Social Media

EBC12785-8450-4D80-BC71-D3ED16E075FFLinda G. Hill has assigned us the word “social” for today’s Stream of Consciousness Saturday prompt. And that got me thinking about the fact that I’m not a very social person. It’s not that I’m antisocial, per se. But I have a very small real world social circle. And I have almost no presence on social media.

Yes, I do have a Facebook account and one on Instagram as well, but I only have them because my adult kids use them to post pictures about their adventurous and interesting lives. I lead neither an adventurous nor an interesting life, so I never post anything on either one.

I don’t do Twitter or Snapchat or Pinterest or any of the other so-called social media sites. I do, of course, use WordPress, but I call WordPress a blogging platform more so than a social media site.

Sure, I suppose one could argue that WordPress is a social media site because most bloggers who use WordPress feel they are part of a community of bloggers and interact with other bloggers by sharing posts and commenting on posts from others. But I don’t put WordPress in the same category as Facebook and Twitter.

And I must be right about that because I Googled “social media sites” and WordPress wasn’t listed as a social media site in any list I came across. But I did discover that there are tons of sites hawking plugins for WordPress. There are sites that explain “How to Turn Your WordPress Site Into a Social Network” or that inform you about the “10 Best Social Media Plugins for WordPress.”

But I’m not interested in turning my blog into a social media site. That said, I do enjoy being “sociable” with those whose blogs I follow and with those who follow my blog. So feel free to keep those comments coming!

Rory’s Provocative Questions

D90AEE63-91C1-4760-822F-66DD11EA0AC5It looks like I’m not the only one who periodically asks provocative questions. Rory, A Guy Called Bloke, has also posed some provocative questions of his own, but unlike mine, his questions offer some multiple choice answers.

Rory’s questions and my answers:

Is Social Media Ruining Genuine Friendship & Encouraging More Loneliness?

  • Yes, It’s Damaging Us
  • No, It’s another format
  • No Opinion
  • Actually, I think…

Yes and no. Just like the advent of the internet, social media does some good and some harm depending upon who’s using it, how they’re using it, and why they’re using it. Sure, some social media sites can have a negative impact on some folks, while for others, they can be very reinforcing. And while social media may be altering the way people interact with one another, I don’t believe that, overall, it is ruining genuine friendships or encouraging greater loneliness. That hasn’t been my experience, anyway. But I don’t have much of a social media presence, other than on WordPress, and I’m an old geezer, so what do I know?

Why Do People Bully Others?

  • Insecurity
  • Avoid Own Problems
  • Look Cool
  • For Fun

 Because some people are assholes.

Which Stigma/Taboo Is Worse?

  • Mental Health
  • Self Harm
  • Suicidality
  • Bullying

I suppose suicide is the most drastic harmful action anyone can take, since there’s no going back once done. I don’t know, in terms of stigmas or taboos, which of the others is worse. Bullying is outwardly directed, so the bully hurts others, whereas self-harm is inwardly directed. And mental health, per se, is neither a stigma nor a taboo. It’s something everyone should strive to maintain or achieve.

Do You NEED People In Your Life? How Many People Do You Meet With & Talk

  • 1-3 per Day
  • 4-9 Per Day
  • 10-17 Per Day
  • 18+ Per Day

I think we all need people. No man — or woman — is an island. That said, the number of people one interacts with depends upon a person’s circumstances and situation. For example, I’m retired, so I no longer interact daily with a whole host of work associates. I have my wife and kids and a very small circle of friends with whom I regularly interact in the real world. And here on WordPress, I interact daily through my blog and their blogs with several dozen “regulars,” way more than in the real world.

Fandango’s Provocative Question #7

FPQEach week I will pose what I think is a provocative question. By provocative, I don’t mean a question that will cause annoyance or anger. Nor do I mean a question intended to arouse sexual desire or interest.

What I do mean is a question that is likely to get you to think, to be creative, and to provoke a response. Hopefully a positive response.

This week’s provocative question occurred to me when I read an article in my local paper about Patreon, a site that allows “patrons” to sign up in order to compensate designated artists and writers for creating content an ongoing basis. I follow a few bloggers who are members of Patreon.

The article noted that Patreon has recently banned a number of its content contributors for posting what it considers to be hate speech. Patreon removed controversial anti-feminist Carl Benjamin, who works under the name Sargon of Akkad, earlier this month from its site for for using racist language on YouTube. That same week, it removed right-wing provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos a day after he opened an account.

These moves by Patreon prompted a revolt by some of Patreon’s more prominent contributors, citing worries about censorship.

The Patreon team wrote:

“Patreon does not and will not condone hate speech in any of its forms. We stand by our policies against hate speech. We believe it’s essential for Patreon to have strong policies against hate speech to build a safe community for our creators and their patrons.”

Other social media sites, from YouTube to Facebook to Twitter and Tumblr, have also banned content creators whose postings they consider to be “hate” speech.

With that in mind, here’s this week’s provocative question.

“Do you believe that social media sites should be able to censor what people post on their sites and ban content creators from posting? Or do you consider such actions to be a violation of freedom of speech, which is guaranteed as a right in the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution?”

If you don’t live in the U.S., please weigh in with your thoughts about freedom of speech versus social media sites banning content contributors in your country.

If you choose to participate, write a post with your response to the question. Once you are done, tag your post with #FPQ and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

And most important, have fun.

Fandango’s Provocative Question #6

FPQEach week I will pose what I think is a provocative question. By provocative, I don’t mean a question that will cause annoyance or anger. Nor do I mean a question intended to arouse sexual desire or interest.

What I do mean is a question that is likely to get you to think, to be creative, and to provoke a response. Hopefully a positive response.

This week’s provocative question came up when I read an article that talked about how the extent that Russia used social media to influence the 2016 presidential election in the United States and the Brexit vote in Great Britain was more extensive than what was originally thought and that such disinformation and misinformation on social media sites continues almost unabated to this day.

With that in mind, here’s this week’s provocative question.

“Is technological advancement a net positive or a net negative?”

If you choose to participate, write a post with your response to the question. Once you are done, tag your post with #FPQ and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

And most important, have fun.