Weekly Song Challenge — Jingle, Geography, and Disney

Laura’s Weekly Song Challenge asks us to:

1. Post a video of a musical commercial jingle.

2. Post a music video of a song that is geographical.

3. Post a music video of a song from an animated Disney movie.

Per Laura, I’m supposed to post the rules, which are…

  • Copy rules and add to your own post, pinging back to this post.
  • Post music videos for your answers to the musical questions.
  • Tag two people to participate!

I’m not good at this tagging thing. In fact, Laura didn’t tag me, but I participated anyway. And so I’m going to invite anyone who wants to play along to go for it.

Song Lyric Sunday — When the Weather is Hot

For this week’s Song Lyric Sunday, Jim Adams has given us the theme of seasons: Winter, Spring, Summer, and Fall. The song I chose is Mungo Jerry’s “In the Summertime.”

“In the Summertime” was the debut single by British rock band Mungo Jerry. Written by its lead singer, Ray Dorset, it celebrated the carefree days of summer. In 1970, it reached number one in charts around the world, eventually selling 30 million copies. Other than “In the Summertime,” though, Mungo Jerry never again charted in the U.S.

Dorset, who was influenced by American beach movies that he watched growing up, called the song, “the teenage dream.” He penned the song in 1968 when he was working for Timex in the UK. The band was just getting started and music was more of a hobby at the time. Dorest says that the famous melody just popped into his head one day, and the next day he wrote the lyrics very quickly.

“It’s got no chorus; all it’s got is a melody that goes over and over again with a set of lyrics that conjure up a celebration of life,” he said. “Especially if you’re a young person: it’s a great day, you’ve managed to get a car — preferably with the top off — you’re cruising around, and if you’re a guy, you’re picking up girls.”

A little bit of trivia: the band’s name, Mungo Jerry, was based upon the character Mungojerrie, from the T. S. Eliot book Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats, which later served as the basis for the Broadway play, Cats).

In the summertime when the weather is hot
You can stretch right up and touch the sky
When the weather’s fine
You got women, you got women on your mind
Have a drink, have a drive
Go out and see what you can find

If her daddy’s rich, take her out for a meal
If her daddy’s poor, just do what you feel
Speed along the lane
Do a ton or a ton and twenty-five
When the sun goes down
You can make it, make it good and really fine

We’re no threat people, we’re not dirty, we’re not mean
We love everybody, but we do as we please
When the weather’s fine
We go fishing or go swimming in the sea
We’re always happy
Life’s for living, yeah, that’s our philosophy

Sing along with us, dee-dee dee-dee dee
Da doo da-da da, yeah, we’re hap-pap-py
Da da da, dee da doo dee da doo da doo da
Da doo da-da da, dee da da dee da da

When the winter’s here, yeah, it’s party time
Bring your bottle, wear your bright clothes
‘Cause it will soon be summertime
And we’ll sing again
We’ll go driving or maybe we’ll settle down
If she’s rich, if she’s nice
Bring your friends and we’ll all go into town

In the summertime when the weather is hot
You can stretch right up and touch the sky
When the weather’s fine
You got women, you got women on your mind
Have a drink, have a drive
Go out and see what you can find

If her daddy’s rich, take her out for a meal
If her daddy’s poor, just do what you feel
Speed along the lane
Do a ton or a ton and twenty-five
When the sun goes down
You can make it, make it good and really fine

We’re no threat people, we’re not dirty, we’re not mean
We love everybody, but we do as we please
When the weather’s fine
We go fishing or go swimming in the sea
We’re always happy
Life’s for living, yeah, that’s our philosophy

Sing along with us, dee-dee dee-dee dee
Da doo da-da da, yeah, we’re hap-pap-py
Da da da, dee da doo dee da doo da doo da
Da doo da-da da, dee da da dee da da

N is for New Age Music

0566B9C7-EBE2-4B93-AEBC-1EFFB020856CThe genre of music I listen to most these days is classic rock. But it wasn’t that long ago, maybe 15-20 years ago, that my music genre of choice was new age.

New age music is a combination of mostly instrumental pieces creating sounds of a soothing, romantic, mood-elevating, and sometimes sensual nature. It’s broadly defined as relaxing, even “meditative,” music. Unlike relaxing forms of classical music, new age music makes greater use of electronic sounds and non-Western instrumentation. I used to describe new age music as a fusion of classical, jazz, and rock.

The large percentage of musical sounds described as new age is instrumental and electronic, although vocal arrangements, while less common, are part of the genre.  Enya, for example, won a Grammy for her new age music. She has an ethereal, almost other-worldly, sound and sings in a variety of languages, including Latin and her native Irish and Celtic.

Some of my favorite new age musicians include Yanni (or as my kids used to call him, “Yawni”), the aforementioned Enya, David Lanz, Susan Ciani, and Kitarō.

And here are a few of my favorite new age songs.


Previous A to Z Challenge 2019 posts:
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

It’s All About the Music

Laura, at Lauravent69, has challenged us to another Weekly Song Challenge. Her rules are:

  • Copy rules and add to your own post, pinging back to this post.
  • Post music videos for your answers to the musical questions.
  • Tag two people to participate!

Here are the three song challenges:

1. Post a music video of a song by an artist popular in the 80s.

2. Post a music video of a song that makes you wanna shake your groove thang!

3. Post a music video of an acoustic version of a popular song.

As to my two tags, let’s go with Mr. Music, Jim Adams, and with the lovely and talented Teresa, The Haunted Wordsmith.

Song Lyric Sunday — Cold as Ice

For this week’s Song Lyric Sunday, Jim Adam chose Freeze/Cold/Ice as his theme. I chose the song “Cold as Ice” by Foreigner. I wouldn’t be surprised if a number of other bloggers also chose this song.

“Cold as Ice” was a 1977 song by the rock band Foreigner from their self-named debut album. It became one of the best known songs of the band in the U.S., peaking at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100. It was written by band members Lou Gramm and Mick Jones.

The song’s message is simple and straightforward. It’s about a woman who is materialistic and selfish — a gold digger — and is throwing away her relationship with her man. He is warning that her behavior will come back to haunt her someday. She’ll pay the price for sacrificing their love.

Here are the song’s lyrics.

You’re as cold as ice
You’re willing to sacrifice our love
You never take advice
Someday you’ll pay the price, I know

I’ve seen it before
It happens all the time
You’re closing the door
You leave the world behind

You’re digging for gold
Yet throwing away
A fortune in feelings
But someday you’ll pay

You’re as cold as ice
You’re willing to sacrifice our love
You want Paradise
But someday you’ll pay the price
I know

I’ve seen it before
It happens all the time
You’re closing the door
You leave the world behind
You’re digging for gold
Yet throwing away
A fortune in feelings
But someday you’ll pay

Cold as ice, you know that you are
Cold, (cold) as, (as) ice,
As cold as ice to me
(Cold, cold cold) (as, as, as) (ice)

(Ooh, ooh, ooh, cold as, cold as ice)
(You’re as cold as icccce)
You’re as cold as ice
(Cold as icccce),
Cold as ice I know
(You’re as cold as icccce)
You’re as cold as ice
(Cold as iccce)
Cold as ice I know
(You’re as cold as icccce)
Oh yes I know
(Cold as icccce)
(You’re as cold as icccce)
You’re as cold as ice
(Cold as icccce)
Cold as ice I know
(You’re as cold as icccce)
Oh, yes I know
(Cold as icccce)