Fandango’s Provocative Question #40

FPQWelcome once again to Fandango’s Provocative Question. Each week I will pose what I think is a provocative question for your consideration. By provocative, I don’t mean a question that will cause annoyance or anger. Nor do I mean a question intended to arouse sexual desire or interest.

What I do mean is a question that is likely to get you to think, to be creative, and to provoke a response. Hopefully a positive response.

This week’s provocative question is about control and how much control each of us has in our lives. I’d like to think I’m calling the shots in my own life, but I know that the reality is that there are all kinds of external factors and events that have influenced the trajectory my life has taken.

So I ask you this:

How much control do you believe you have over your own life?

If you choose to participate, write a post with your response to the question. Once you are done, tag your post with #FPQ and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

The issue with pingbacks not showing up seems to have been resolved, but you might check to confirm that your pingback is there. If not, please manually add your link in the comments.

Fandango’s Provocative Question #39

FPQWelcome once again to Fandango’s Provocative Question. Each week I will pose what I think is a provocative question for your consideration. By provocative, I don’t mean a question that will cause annoyance or anger. Nor do I mean a question intended to arouse sexual desire or interest.

What I do mean is a question that is likely to get you to think, to be creative, and to provoke a response. Hopefully a positive response.

For this week’s provocative question, I am wondering about “magic.” I wrote a post earlier this week about a Catholic school in Tennessee that banned the “Harry Potter” series of books, and I noted that “a number of Christian critics believe the Bible makes it clear that magic stems from demonic sources.

Religious historian Henrik Bogdan wrote, “The term magic has typically been used to describe non-mainstream beliefs and practices — non-Christians, heretics, non-Westerners, indigenous, ancient or ‘primitive’ cultures — any that might be considered ‘Other.’” Bogdan went on to say that “defining magic as something alien, exotic, primitive, evil, deviant or even ridiculous” enables western society to make a tacit statement about its self-perceptions.

So my question for this week is simply this:

Do you believe in magic? Define magic any way you wish and explain your belief about magic.

(No extra credit for embedding the song “Do You Believe in Magic” by the Lovin’ Spoonful in your response.)

If you choose to participate, write a post with your response to the question. Once you are done, tag your post with #FPQ and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

The issue with pingbacks not showing up seems to have been resolved, but you might check to confirm that your pingback is there. If not, please manually add your link in the comments.

Fandango’s Provocative Question #38

FPQWelcome once again to Fandango’s Provocative Question. Each week I will pose what I think is a provocative question for your consideration. By provocative, I don’t mean a question that will cause annoyance or anger. Nor do I mean a question intended to arouse sexual desire or interest.

What I do mean is a question that is likely to get you to think, to be creative, and to provoke a response. Hopefully a positive response.

For this week’s provocative question, I overheard a conversation a few mornings ago at a coffee shop. Two women were arguing about honesty. One woman said that honesty is the most important characteristic a person can possess and there is never an excuse for dishonesty. Never under any circumstances, she insisted. The other woman argued that sometimes being less than brutally honest can be an act of kindness in order to protect the feelings of someone you care about.

I made the mistake of interrupting these two women, telling them that I couldn’t help overhearing their rather loud conversation. Then I asked them if they told their children, when they were young, that Santa Claus was real. They both said that of course they did. And when I opined that they were not being honest with their kids — in fact, they were lying to their own children — by telling them that Santa Claus was real…well, let’s just say they both stood up, gave me dirty looks, and exited the coffee shop.

So my question to you this week is simply this: is it ever appropriate for a man to interrupt two women arguing in a coffee shop?

No, just kidding. My actual question is about honesty.

Do you believe that honesty is always the best policy? Is there is ever a time or circumstance when dishonesty (lying) is justifiable? Please elaborate.

If you choose to participate, write a post with your response to the question. Once you are done, tag your post with #FPQ and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

The issue with pingbacks not showing up seems to have been resolved, but you might check to confirm that your pingback is there. If not, please manually add your link in the comments.

Fandango’s Provocative Question #37

FPQWelcome once again to Fandango’s Provocative Question. Each week I will pose what I think is a provocative question for your consideration. By provocative, I don’t mean a question that will cause annoyance or anger. Nor do I mean a question intended to arouse sexual desire or interest.

What I do mean is a question that is likely to get you to think, to be creative, and to provoke a response. Hopefully a positive response.

For this week’s provocative question, I am concerned about how partisan just about everybody appears to be. We seem to have reached the point where everyone behaves as if “you’re either with me or you’re against me,” and there is no middle ground.

I remember that there was a time not that long ago when people could disagree about specific issues without animosity, but those days seem to be over, particularly in the areas of politics and religion.

So my question to you this week is simply this:

Is it possible anymore to disagree without being disagreeable?

If you choose to participate, write a post with your response to the question. Once you are done, tag your post with #FPQ and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

The issue with pingbacks not showing up seems to have been resolved, but you might check to confirm that your pingback is there. If not, please manually add your link in the comments.

Fandango’s Provocative Question #36

FPQWelcome once again to Fandango’s Provocative Question. Each week I will pose what I think is a provocative question for your consideration. By provocative, I don’t mean a question that will cause annoyance or anger. Nor do I mean a question intended to arouse sexual desire or interest.

What I do mean is a question that is likely to get you to think, to be creative, and to provoke a response. Hopefully a positive response.

For this week’s provocative question, I am asking about means and ends. I have often heard people say that “the end justifies the means.” Conversely, I’ve heard others say that “the means justifies the end.” So what about you?

Do you think the end or the means is more important? Explain.

If you choose to participate, write a post with your response to the question. Once you are done, tag your post with #FPQ and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

The issue with pingbacks not showing up seems to have been resolved, but you might check to confirm that your pingback is there. If not, please manually add your link in the comments.