In Other Words — Daily Prompts

2E12834B-7223-427A-8FD9-CD66284699EDEach and every day, a handful of bloggers post daily word prompts.

And each and every day I look at the four to eight daily prompt words and try to weave them all into a coherent and cohesive post.

For example, today’s eight daily prompt are resolute, blind, explicate, tag, unrequited, extravaganza, variable, and idle chatter.

It’s not always easy, and sometimes it’s quite challenging, to come up with a post that successfully leverages many or all of those prompts words.

There’s only one way that I can figure out how to fit all eight of today’s daily word prompts into a single post — and that is to improvise.


In other wordsWritten for the In Other Words prompt from Patricia’s Place. The challenge this week is to write a story or poem of five lines or fewer using the picture above and/or the words “improvise.” Image credit: Tumisu from Pixabay. Also for these daily prompts: Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (resolute), The Daily Spur (blind), Your Daily Word Prompt (explicate), Daily Addictions (tag), Word of the Day Challenge (unrequited), Ragtag Daily Prompt (extravaganza), Nova’s Daily Random Word (variable), and Weekly Prompts (idle chatter).

So Many Words

9670BE73-11FD-4242-AD7A-860EA68E3836As many of you who read my blog know, I try to incorporate four or five daily prompt words into a post each day. In addition to my Fandango’s One-Word Challenge, there’s the Word of the Day Challenge, the Ragtag Daily Prompt, the Your Daily Word Prompt, and, more recently, the Daily Spur.

Now two other bloggers have upped the ante. Roger Shipp has resurrected his popular Daily Addictions prompt and Nova has brought back her Nova’s Daily Random Word prompt.

So today we are offered seven daily words: productive, pollution, adversity, drive, puzzle, target, and youthful.

Okay, the gauntlet has been thrown and I’m going to pick it up now.


“Our nation is facing a serious crisis. Pollution of the air we breathe and the water we drink is bringing about a potential environmental catastrophe,” the candidate said.

“It is critical that we, as citizens, come together and target the crisis with productive approaches,” she continued. “This is not a puzzle that is unsolvable. We need to apply your youthful exuberance to drive this country toward cleaner air and water and to overcome the adversity that doing nothing will bring about. It’s your futures that are at stake. Thank you.”

The candidate for student council president received a standing ovation from Miss Brown’s first grade class.

Not Just My Verse — Insomnia

72EC02B7-B1F8-49A3-98B6-FAC597ED994FSo Rory (A Guy Called Bloke) started another one of his poetry blog hop thingies. He chooses a topic — in this case, insomnia — and writes four lines of rhyming verse. Then he tags one of his readers who will, in turn, add his or her own four lines of rhyming verse to Rory’s and then tag one of his or her own readers to do the same. And so on and so on. It’s a case of wash, rinse, repeat. Once the poem [verse] leaves Rory’s blog, the next series of bloggers can take it wherever they want with regards their own four line verses, but they must always stay on topic.

Here’s how Rory got it started:

Why do you evade me so? It makes for no sense,
In truth, to do so unkindly and unwarranted, is nonsense!
I have tried counting all sorts, from stars to wide eyed sheep!
Yet still you, yes you decline me shut eye and valuable sleep!

 Jay-lin of The Wonderful and Wacky World of one Single Mum

Tossing and turning pulling blankets near,
What is that noise that I hear?
It is not the sandman come for me,
Why won’t you let me sleep dear?    

Gary of Bereaved Single Dad

Countless late night biscuits and black coffee,
Walking around like a spaced out zombie,
Listening to Cohen and Floyd on endless loop,
Convincing myself that no sleep is common in my age group.

Lorraine of Blind Wilderness

I toss and I turn
Oh when will I learn
That sleep is at bay
On an Away Day

Di at Pensitivity101

The stars are so bright at this time of night,
I look forward to slumbering deep,
As I close my tired eyes, what a surprise,
The brain wakes and I can’t get to sleep!

Teresa at The Haunted Wordsmith

The shadows creep along the wall
like predators waiting for me to fall.
My pillow–my shield; flashlight–my sword,
The most dangerous thing is a mind that’s bored.

And now it’s my turn:

Wide awake, I turn and look at my clock to see
That it’s three a.m. and I have to get up to pee
Back in bed I close my eyes, then check my clock once more.
Oh my God, it’s not even four!

Okay. I’m going to throw this over to my buddy Jim Adams to add his four lines of rhyming verse.

SoCS — Homophonia

For today’s Stream of Consciousness Saturday prompt, Linda G. Hill has given us an exercise in homophonia. No, that’s not a typo. She didn’t ask us to write a stream of consciousness post about homophobia. She asked us to write a post using “for,” “fore,” and/or “four.” She said we could use one of them, all of them, or any of them. So I guess I’m done since I just used all three of them.

Just kidding!

“For,” “fore,” and “four” are homophones. That is, they are words that sound alike, but have different meanings, and have different spellings.

“For” is the 12th most commonly used word in the English language. It’s everywhere and has multiple uses. According to Dictionary.com, “for” has 32 different ways it can be used as a preposition and two additional ways it can be used as a conjunction. “For” is quite a handy dandy little word.

At the opposite end of word variations is “four,” which is simply and pretty much only used as a number, as in one, two, three, four.

And somewhere in between, in terms of meanings, is “fore.” It can mean the front of a boat, as in “fore and aft.” Or it can mean in, toward, or near the front. Or it can be what someone shouts right before you get knocked unconscious by getting hit in the head by a golf ball.3CFE79EF-E66C-4913-B56D-75BE6DA7C683A few other common examples of homophones are:

  • to/too/two
  • there/their/they’re
  • by/buy/bye
  • know/no
  • here/hear
  • ate/eight

Well, Okay, you get the idea.

Now I’m done.

SoCS — Déjà Vu All Over Again

When I saw that today’s Stream of Consciousness Saturday prompt from Linda G. Hill said for us to “start your post with any adverb and just run with it.” I thought “been there, done that.”

Sure enough I dug into my archives and just over three months ago, Linda gave us this SoCS challenge: “start your post with any adverb that ends in ‘-ly.’”

So, being the lazy bastard that I am, I’m going to essentially repost (with a few minor edits) what I posted on February 9th. Here goes.


D565E643-654E-4772-8799-BCA48E331BC7First of all, let’s define the word adverb. “An adverb is a part of speech used to describe a verb, adjective, clause, or another adverb. It simply tells the readers how, where, when, or the degree at which something was done.”

Apparently, the biggest issue with adverbs is that people tend to overuse them. Some say that of all of the parts of speech, adverbs are the most likely to clutter your sentences pointlessly. Therefore, it is often suggested that writers should use adverbs sparingly.

(Hey wait. Aren’t “apparently,” pointlessly,” and “sparingly” adverbs? Oh crap. I just cluttered up my last paragraph by using three adverbs in just three sentences.)

I remember reading Stephen King’s book, On Writing, where he goes on and on about how he feels about adverbs. I was surprised by his strong feelings. He admonishes writers to minimize, if not eliminate, their use of adverbs by suggesting that “adverbs, like the passive voice, seem to have been created with the timid writer in mind.”

King famously wrote:

“I believe the road to hell is paved with adverbs, and I will shout it from the rooftops. To put it another way, they’re like dandelions. If you have one in your lawn, it looks pretty and unique. If you fail to root it out, however, you find five the next day…fifty the day after that…and then, my brothers and sisters, your lawn is totally, completely, and profligately covered with dandelions. By then you see them for the weeds they really are, but by then it’s — GASP!! — too late.”

Personally, I think Stephen King overuses ellipses…as do I.

I have nothing against adverbs. I don’t use them often, but I do use them in my writing. And I don’t think of myself as a timid writer.

But I’m not a best-selling author, like Stephen King. In fact, I’m not an author at all. I’m not even sure I’d call myself a writer. I’m just a blogger who writes posts on my personal blog.

So, as the old song goes, it’s my blog and I’ll adverb if I want to, despite how Stephen King feels.


Apologies to Linda and to those of you who read my previous SoCS post about adverbs for recycling an old post, but it’s Saturday and I have things to do, people to see, and places to go. So deal with it.