Fandango’s Flashback Friday — July 23rd

Wouldn’t you like to expose your newer readers to some of your earlier posts that they might never have seen? Or remind your long term followers of posts that they might not remember? Each Friday I will publish a post I wrote on this exact date in a previous year.

How about you? Why don’t you reach back into your own archives and highlight a post that you wrote on this very date in a previous year? You can repost your Friday Flashback post on your blog and pingback to this post. Or you can just write a comment below with a link to the post you selected.

If you’ve been blogging for less than a year, go ahead and choose a post that you previously published on this day (the 23rd) of any month within the past year and link to that post in a comment.


This was originally posted on July 23, 2017.

Kick Me

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“So what shall we do for kicks today?” Penny asked her boyfriend, Art.

“How about a road trip?” Art suggested.

“Cool! Where to?”

“We can get our kicks on Route 66,” Art answered.

“Maybe we should just stay here and kick back,” Penny said.

“Okay, fine,” said Art. “Whatcha got to drink?”

“I get no kicks from champagne,” Penny replied.

“Ain’t that a kick in the head!” said Art.

“But I do get a kick out of you,” Penny purred, winking suggestively at Art.

“Now that’s a kick-ass thing to say,” Art beamed.

“I lied,” Penny admitted. “I want to kick the shit out of you.”

“Hey, kick me while I’m down, why don’t you?” Art joked.

Penny put her arms around Art’s neck and sensually whispered in his ear, “Kick me, Art.”

“Okay, Babe, but just for kicks,” Art said as he pressed his lips to hers.


This post is my contribution to Sandi’s Manic Monday challenge. Each week Sandi gives a song title and challenges us to write a post using the title of the song. This week’s song title is “Kicks,” released in 1966 by Paul Revere and the Raiders.


Fandango’s Flashback Friday — July 16th

Wouldn’t you like to expose your newer readers to some of your earlier posts that they might never have seen? Or remind your long term followers of posts that they might not remember? Each Friday I will publish a post I wrote on this exact date in a previous year.

How about you? Why don’t you reach back into your own archives and highlight a post that you wrote on this very date in a previous year? You can repost your Friday Flashback post on your blog and pingback to this post. Or you can just write a comment below with a link to the post you selected.

If you’ve been blogging for less than a year, go ahead and choose a post that you previously published on this day (the 16th) of any month within the past year and link to that post in a comment.


This was originally posted on July 16, 2017.

Hear Hear

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So you know how, when you want to express enthusiasm or agreement with something someone else has said and you yell out “hear, hear!”?

Hmm. Or do you yell out “here, here!”?

I suppose if you yell it out, it doesn’t matter if you’re yelling “hear, hear” or “here, here” because “hear” and “here” are homophones, or words that are spelled differently, have different meanings, but sound the same.

And, just for the record, “homophones” and “homophobes” are spelled differently and have different meanings. But while they have a similar sound, they don’t sound the same, as do “hear” and “here.” So please don’t yell at me for being insensitive and using the term “homophones” in this post. I’m not Mike Pence, you know.

But I digress. This “hear, hear” versus “here, here” matter is not something I wondered about very often because I was confident in my knowledge that “hear, hear!” was correct. Besides, how likely am I to ever use that specific expression in my writing?

But I have seen other people write “here, hear!” or “hear, here!” or even “here, here!” and I began to question my knowledge regarding this exclamation. Which combination of these two similar sounding but different meaning words is correct? Could I be wrong?

So I Googled it and I am pleased to say that I can savor this moment. The correct answer is “hear, hear!” Damn I’m good.

According to the website, Grammarist, “Hear, hear is the conventional spelling of the colloquial exclamation used to express approval for a speaker or sentiment. It’s essentially short for ‘hear him, hear him’ or ‘hear this, hear this,’ where these phrases are a sort of cheer.”

“Here, here,” however, “is widely regarded as a misspelling, although it is a common one.” It can be used appropriately, though, when calling your dog to come to where you are, as in “Fido, here, here!.” It doesn’t work with cats.

Where did this exclamation originate? Well, according to a Wikipedia article, the source is the Hebrew Bible, Samuel II 20:16: “Then cried a wise woman out of the city: ‘Hear, hear; say, I pray you, unto Joab: Come near hither, that I may speak with thee.’”

An alternative theory, also noted in Wikipedia, suggests that the phrase “hear him, hear him!” was used in the British Parliament from late in the 17th century. It was later reduced to “hear!” or “hear, hear!” by the late 18th century.

And you know what? This is probably more than you ever wanted to know about this topic.

Can I get a “Hear, Hear!”?


This is my post for today’s WordPress one-word prompt: “savor.”

Fandango’s Flashback Friday — July 9th

Wouldn’t you like to expose your newer readers to some of your earlier posts that they might never have seen? Or remind your long term followers of posts that they might not remember? Each Friday I will publish a post I wrote on this exact date in a previous year.

How about you? Why don’t you reach back into your own archives and highlight a post that you wrote on this very date in a previous year? You can repost your Friday Flashback post on your blog and pingback to this post. Or you can just write a comment below with a link to the post you selected.

If you’ve been blogging for less than a year, go ahead and choose a post that you previously published on this day (the 9th) of any month within the past year and link to that post in a comment.


This was originally posted on July 9, 2017.

Savage Me

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“I want you to savage me,” she said, glancing at him with a wicked smile on her face.

“You mean you want me to ravage you, don’t you?” he responded.

“What?”

“Savage is usually used as an adjective or a noun,” he said. “It’s rarely used as a verb. One doesn’t savage something…or someone.”

“What?” she repeated, now with a quizzical look on her face.

“Yes,” he continued. “Savage means undomesticated or lacking normal human constraints. But ravage means to wreak havoc upon. So what you really want me to do,” he said as he winked at her and flashed what he hoped was a sexy look, “is to wreak havoc upon you, not to act undomesticated or to lack normal human constraints. Hence, you want me to ravage you, not savage you.”

“No,” she said emphatically as she jumped up out of the bed and put on her robe. She turned around and glared at him. “You want to know what I really want? I really want you to get up, get dressed, and get out of here. You are an asshole. A pedantic asshole.”

“Wow,” he said. “You really know how to savage a guy.”


This is my post for today’s WordPress one-word prompt: “savage.”

Fandango’s Flashback Friday — July 2nd

Wouldn’t you like to expose your newer readers to some of your earlier posts that they might never have seen? Or remind your long term followers of posts that they might not remember? Each Friday I will publish a post I wrote on this exact date in a previous year.

How about you? Why don’t you reach back into your own archives and highlight a post that you wrote on this very date in a previous year? You can repost your Friday Flashback post on your blog and pingback to this post. Or you can just write a comment below with a link to the post you selected.

If you’ve been blogging for less than a year, go ahead and choose a post that you previously published on this day (the 2nd) of any month within the past year and link to that post in a comment.


This was originally posted on July 2, 2017. Four years later and he’s still a sad excuse of a man. Isn’t that sad?

A Sad Excuse

I don’t know about you, but I think Donald Trump is a sad excuse for a human being, much less as President of the United States and leader of the free world.

So when I recently heard a comedian, a former politician, a news commentator, and an editorial writer for a major metropolitan newspaper say or write some quips about “The Donald” that resonated with me, I decided to post them right here on my little blog.

First there was comedian Bill Maher. He said on his HBO show the other night, “Once again, Donald Trump has taught us a valuable lesson: you can never be too rich to be white trash.”

Then I read that a former Mayor of San Francisco, Willie Brown, said he overheard a guy in a bar say, “Donald Trump handles politics the same way most people handle fireworks on the Fourth of July. Light the fuse and run like hell.”

On her weekend AM Joy show on MSNBC, Joy Reid said “Just when you think it can’t get any lower, Donald Trump redefines what rock bottom means.”

Finally, I read a comment in the editorial section of my local paper this morning. It read, “President Trump further demeans the office with a vile, misogynous tweet attacking MSNBC’s Mika Brzezinski. His dignity is hemorrhaging badly.”

As we get set to celebrate the birth of our nation here in the U.S., let’s hope that this won’t be our last true Independence Day as a free nation. The way things are going, next year at this time we may be a member nation of the Russian Federation.

And that’s no joke.

Fandango’s Flashback Friday — June 25th

Wouldn’t you like to expose your newer readers to some of your earlier posts that they might never have seen? Or remind your long term followers of posts that they might not remember? Each Friday I will publish a post I wrote on this exact date in a previous year.

How about you? Why don’t you reach back into your own archives and highlight a post that you wrote on this very date in a previous year? You can repost your Friday Flashback post on your blog and pingback to this post. Or you can just write a comment below with a link to the post you selected.

If you’ve been blogging for less than a year, go ahead and choose a post that you previously published on this day (the 25th) of any month within the past year and link to that post in a comment.


This was originally posted on June 25, 2018.

Supreme Court — Racially-Motivated Gerrymandering is A-OK

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In a 5-4, party-lines decision, The Supreme Court of the United States voted to approve racially-motivated gerrymandering, which is surprising because, in the past, SCOTUS has held that Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) outlaws gerrymandering when it dilutes the votes of minority citizens.

The VRA was meant to enforce the 15th Amendment’s bar on racial voter suppression by blocking state voting laws suspected of racial discrimination. Section 2 forbids any “standard, practice, or procedure” that “results in the denial or abridgement” of the right to vote “on account of race or color.” But that is exactly what gerrymandering is intended to do.

In Abbott v. Perez, Trump’s only (so far) SCOTUS appointee, Neil Gorsuch — along with the Court’s conservative majority — has position himself as a fierce opponent of the Voting Rights Act. Gorsuch held that Texas’ maps for its congressional seats and statehouse districts do not prohibit racial gerrymandering, even though those who drew those voting district lines have privately confessed that that was their intent.

How in the hell will the United States ever recover from this kind of partisan bullshit? How can these Supreme Court justices, who allegedly possess such brilliant legal and constitutional minds, be so fucking dense?


June 25, 2021 update: Here we are three years later and the Republicans in the U.S. Senate — all 50 of them, just voted to blocked the For the People Act, the most ambitious voting rights legislation to come before Congress in a generation. What’s that old saying? The more things change, the more they remain the same.