Thursday Inspiration — I Know

For Jim Adams’ Thursday Inspiration prompt this week, we can use the prompt word know, or going with the above picture, or by means of the song ‘All for Love,’ or by going with another song by Bryan Adams, or anything else that you think fits.

How about this? “I Know (You Don’t Love Me No More)” was an R&B song written and recorded by American singer Barbara George, released as her debut single in 1961. It became her signature song and her only major hit in United States, reaching number 1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart and number 3 in the Hot 100.

Thursday Inspiration — Here Comes The Sun

Written for Jim Adams’ Thursday Inspiration prompt, where we can use the prompt word sun, or going with the above picture, or by means of the song ‘Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me,’ or by going with another song by Elton John, or anything else that you think fits.

How about this?

Thursday Inspiration — Me or the Dog

“Absolutely not!” Jim said to Darlene. “When I agreed to let you bring this fleabag dog home from the pet store, you promised that you would keep it off of our bed. So what do you do? You go out and buy steps so that hound of yours can use them to climb up on our bed. I won’t have it, dammit.”

“But honey, he’s so cute and when he climbs up on the bed, he stays on my side, cuddles up next to me, and loves to snuggle, which, by the way, is more than you ever do anymore,” Darlene said.

“I don’t care,” Jim said. “You made me a promise and I’m going to hold you to it. I will not have that mutt in our bed. Now where did you get that step thing? I’m going to take it back and get a refund.”

“You’re not taking it back,” Darlene insisted. “And if I want the dog to sleep in our bed all snuggled up next to me, he will.”

“It’s me or the dog, Darlene,” Jim said.

Darlene smiled. “Bye, Jim,” she said.


Written for Jim Adams’ Thursday Inspiration prompt, where we can use the prompt word step, or going with the above picture, or by means of the song ‘Hold On,’ or by going with another song by Wilson Phillips, or anything else that you think fits.

Does this fit?

Thursday Inspiration — Clouds

For this week’s Thursday Inspiration post from Jim Adams, he gave us the image above and the word “clouds.” I hope Jim doesn’t mind, but I’m taking a shortcut by reposting what I think is a relevant post I wrote on August 17, 2017.

Both Sides Now

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“Look at the one on the right. It looks like a flag about to unfurl,” said Jenny, pointing toward the sky. She and her best friend Liz were taking a much needed break from their hike through the scenic, rocky terrain.

“It reminds me of that whirling Tasmanian devil cartoon character,” said Liz. “The one to its left looks like a firework after it exploded and the breeze has picked up the residual and is starting to blow it away.”

Staring at these clouds brings to mind that old Joni Mitchell song,” said Jenny. “Damn, I can’t think of the name of that song.”

“It’s ‘Both Sides Now’ I think,” Liz responded.

“Oh right,” Jenny said. The lyrics talk about looking at clouds.

Liz said, “Yes, I know.” She then softly sang some of the lyrics from the song.

Rows and flows of angel hair
And ice cream castles in the air
And feather canyons everywhere
I’ve looked at clouds that way

I’ve looked at clouds from both sides now
From up and down and still somehow
It’s cloud’s illusions I recall
I really don’t know clouds at all

“That’s beautiful,” said.

Both women sat in silence for a while, marveling at the ever-changing, wispy cloud formations as they traversed the skyscape.


Written for today’s one-word prompt, “unfurl,” and for this week’s writing challenge from Sue Vincent for #writephoto. It’s a twofer!

And, as a bonus, here’s Joni’s song.

Thursday Inspiration — Lonely Boy

For this week’s Thursday Inspiration post from Jim Adams, he gave us the image above and the word “lonely.” My mind immediately took me to the 1959 Paul Anka song, “Lonely Boy.”

Anka had a talent for writing about the teenage experience in the 50s. “I was a lonely boy and I’d see these lonely boys at all these hops,” he said in the cover notes on his Greatest Hits album.

Anka was just 16 in 1957 when his song “Diana” topped the charts on both sides of the Atlantic, making him an international star. He quickly became one of the biggest stars of the late ’50s. But he felt there was something missing. “In moving around so much, I never had time to spend with the people really close to me,” he said. “I wanted to experience more than just the success syndrome.

In this song, Anka revealed that, despite his success, he was still lonely: “I’ve got everything you could think of / But all I want is someone to love.” He said, “I was reaching out, saying, ‘Hey, I want somebody to share this with me.’”

When I was researching this song, I came across another song by the same name. Andrew Gold had an international hit with his song, “Lonely Boy,” in 1977. It spent five months on the American charts, peaking at number seven in both Canada and the United States, and number 11 in the United Kingdom.

Gold’s “Lonely Boy” is about the life of a child who is neglected by his parents after the birth of a younger sister. Many assume this song was autobiographical, yet Gold has denied this, despite great similarities between the lyrics and Gold’s own life. The lyric, “He was born on a summer day in 1951” matches Gold’s August 1951 birthday, and “In the summer of ‘53 his mother / Brought him a sister” matches his sister’s birthday.”

Which “Lonely Boy” song do you like better?