50 Word Thursday — Sanctuary

F95EF0E0-C9A1-43B9-9145-AB600AAEF1F7“Why did you bring me here?” Miss Wonderly asked in a hushed voice.

“I love it here. It gives me comfort and joy. It’s my sanctuary, it offers me peace, and I wanted to share this place with you,” Miss Anthrope answered.

Miss Wonderly murmured, “Thank you,” softly as before and sat down on the edge of the chair’s wooden seat. “But you know I don’t believe, don’t you?” she said.

“That’s okay. I just felt the need to share this with you. Can’t you feel His presence?

“Feel whose presence?”

“God’s presence, silly girl.”

“Sorry, but no, I don’t.”

(100 words)


Written for this week’s 50 Word Thursday prompt from Kristian at Tales From the Mind of Kristian. The idea is to use the image above (unattributed), along with the lines, “Miss Wonderly murmured, ‘Thank you,’ softly as before and sat down on the edge of the chair’s wooden seat,” from Dashiell Hammett’s The Maltese Falcon and to write a post that must be between 50 and 250 words, in 50 word increments.


 

Do People Really Believe This Shit?

11be17e7-5c6f-467c-be9c-e0d133e972cd.jpegAfter more than 30 people were killed in two deadly shootings this weekend, Ohio state Rep. Candice Keller, in a Facebook post, complained that Democrats play “the blame game” after every mass shooting.

She wrote that the real blame should be on the “breakdown of the traditional American family” and “acceptance of recreational marijuana.” Keller also blamed the gun violence on homosexual marriage, drag queen advocates, violent video games, open borders, kneeling athletes, and ignoring the importance of God and the church.

Interestingly, there was no mention of the proliferation of guns nor of high-capacity, semiautomatic, military-style killing machines.

And, oh yes, she also blames the “snowflakes, who can’t accept a duly-elected President.” Sheesh.

Here is her full Facebook post:

“The breakdown of the traditional American family (thank you, transgender, homosexual marriage, and drag queen advocates); fatherlessness, a subject no one discuses or believes is relevant; the ignoring of violent video games; the relaxing of laws against criminals (open borders); the acceptance of recreational marijuana; failed school policies (hello parents who defend misbehaving students); disrespect to law enforcement (thank you, Obama); hatred of our veterans (thank you, professional athletes who hate our flag and National Anthem); the Dem Congress, many members whom are open anti-Semitic; the culture, which totally ignores the importance of God and the church (until they elect a President); state officeholders, who have no interest whatsoever in learning about our Constitution and the Second Amendement; and snowflakes, who can’t accept a duly-elected President.”

If our elected representatives really believe this shit, we, my fellow Americans, are in deep doo doo.

Backyard Camping

Camping in a Tent Under the Stars and Milky Way GalaxyWhen I was a kid, my parents never sent me to summer camp, but they did allow me to set up a large tent behind our house on weekends. They would let me invite a few friends over to spend the night under the stars in our backyard.

Each kid would bring over snacks, like Oreos, potato chips, or candy, although George, who was a vegetarian, always brought homemade spinach chips that his mother made. Truth be told, they weren’t as bad as one might think spinach chips would be.

Speaking about being under the stars, one of my friends, Andy, would claim, as we looked up at the night sky, that God had placed all the heavenly bodies in the night sky and that they all orbit the Earth. I thought what Andy said was a demonstration of his credulity with respect to religion and the Bible.

I told my father about what Andy was saying. My father explained that the universe is vast, is expanding, and is not delimited. He also pointed out that the stars and planets do not, in fact, orbit the Earth. And then he gave me a book, an astral guide, so that I could point out all of the planets and stars to my friends.

Apparently Andy told his parents that I had a book that contradicted the Bible and that I was telling everyone that God did not put the planets and stars in the sky. Andy’s parents then decided that he could no longer join me and my friends on our weekend backyard camp outs. I guess they thought my family and I were “confusing” him.

Andy is now a Republican member of Congress.


Written for these daily prompts: Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (camp, house), Daily Addictions (spinach), The Daily Spur (mother), Nova’s Daily Random Word (credulity), Your Daily Word Prompt, (delimited), Word of the Day Challenge (book), and Ragtag Daily Prompt (astral).

Fandango’s Provocative Question #33

FPQWelcome once again to Fandango’s Provocative Question. Each week I will pose what I think is a provocative question for your consideration. By provocative, I don’t mean a question that will cause annoyance or anger. Nor do I mean a question intended to arouse sexual desire or interest.

What I do mean is a question that is likely to get you to think, to be creative, and to provoke a response. Hopefully a positive response.

For this week’s provocative question, I am going to leverage a recent provocative post from Marilyn Armstrong in which she wrote about what it means to have a moral compass.  In her post, Marilyn wrote that she believes the concept of a moral compass is how one defines right and wrong, independent of religious beliefs. She wrote, “I’ve concluded that ‘religiosity’ and ‘morality’ have little to do with each other because you either have a moral compass — or you don’t.” You can read Marilyn’s full post here.

There are also those who believe that morality is a set of definitive laws gifted to humanity by God, where God has determined what is “right” and what is “wrong,” and these determinations are deemed to be unimpeachable. In other words, morality cannot exist without God. Thus “morality” and “religiosity” are inextricably intertwined.

So the question this week is this:

Do you believe that one can be moral without believing in God or being religious, or do you believe that you must believe in God in order to have a moral compass and to live a moral life?

If you choose to participate, write a post with your response to the question. Once you are done, tag your post with #FPQ and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

The issue with pingbacks not showing up seems to have been resolved, but you might check to confirm that your pingback is there. If not, please manually add your link in the comments.

Fandango’s Provocative Question #19

FPQEach week I will pose what I think is a provocative question for your consideration. By provocative, I don’t mean a question that will cause annoyance or anger. Nor do I mean a question intended to arouse sexual desire or interest.

What I do mean is a question that is likely to get you to think, to be creative, and to provoke a response. Hopefully a positive response.

This week’s provocative question is a spinoff of a question that Melanie (Sparks From a Combustible Mind) asked in her last Share Your World post. Her question was:

“You find a book and begin to read it only to discover that it is about your life. You get to the point in the book that you are at now. Do you turn the page knowing that you will not be able to change the events to come?”

That question from Melanie got me thinking about the notion of fate and predestination. So here’s this week’s provocative question. Actually it’s a multi-part question.

“Do you believe in fate and/or predestination? If so, what or who is the source? If you do believe in predestination, is there anything anyone can do to change their predestined fate?”

And bonus: “If you believe God is the source, and God has already determined the future for each of us, why should people bother to pray?”

If you choose to participate, write a post with your response to the question. Once you are done, tag your post with #FPQ and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

And most important, have fun.