In Other Words — Pink Flamingos

17194ABB-B12F-4867-9BDB-8E7886DC5B0AShe said, “Let’s go to the movies and see ‘Pink Flamingos’ at the local art house theater.”

“If we want to see a pink flamingo, wouldn’t we be better off going to the zoo?” I asked.

“Oh no, ‘Pink Flamingos’ is a campy movie that was directed by John Waters and starred Divine,” she said. “I’m sure you’ll love it.”

It was awful; the worst movie I ever saw and I hated it.11F3AD74-5F5A-4FBA-9349-B55819D5E5C7


In other wordsWritten for the In Other Words prompt from Patricia’s Place. The challenge this week is to write a story or poem of five lines or fewer using the picture above and/or the word “flamingo.” Top photo credit: Len from Pexels.

Twittering Tales — At the Zoo

50474750-943F-4EB2-A505-4FF91684FB36“What does it say?” the boy asked.

“It’s about how the ancient Egyptians built a zoo using crude tools,” the man said. “And all of the birds, animals, and snakes they kept at the zoo.”

“Wow,” the boy said, “really?”

“I don’t know, kid,” the man grinned. “I can’t read hieroglyphics.”

(280 characters)


Written for Kat Myrman’s Twittering Tales prompt. Photo credit: fotoerich at Pixabay.com.

Goddam Crazy Monkey

FEBF1B01-E7ED-43C2-92DF-7C484E477F37I can’t believe that that goddam monkey, you know, the one that escaped from the zoo back at the end of April, just picked up a goddam brick and threw it right through my car’s goddam windshield.

What did I ever do to that goddam, crazy monkey to deserve that?


This piece of microfiction was written for Teresa’s Three Things Challenge, where the three things are monkey, April, and brick.

A Detective Story

The dispatcher had received a call from the housemate of a 26-year-old white female who hadn’t returned home the night before from a blind date and wasn’t answering her cellphone.

It wasn’t a surprise that, at first, the police paid little attention to the dispatcher’s report. After all, mornings were like a zoo at the precinct. All of the nocturnal creatures from the night before were stepping into the light, so to speak, and the officers on duty were barely keeping their heads above water.

Besides, these are modern times and the woman was over 21. Perhaps she and her blind date really hit it off. Maybe she intentionally shut off her cell so as not to spoil “the moment.” But when she also failed to show up for work that morning, the report started to get some serious attention.

Detective Fred Morrisey had been given a heads up when they found a green dress and some other articles of clothing hidden in the bushes around the reservoir about two hours after the initial missing persons call. According to the paperwork Morrisey had reviewed, the green dress matched the description of what the missing woman had been wearing when last seen by her housemate. No wallet, purse, or cellphone were found where the clothing had been spotted.

Was she alone or with her blind date, Morrisey silently wondered. Who was he and what happened to him? Could it have been an attempted robbery that went bad? Something as simple as a purse snatching? Maybe the victim fought back and ended up getting injured — or worse — in the struggle.

Morrisey’s experienced gut told him that sooner or later the uniforms would find the naked body of the woman who belonged in that green dress. But until they did, there was no case for him to pursue. Without a body, there was nothing for him, a homicide detective, to officially investigate. No body, no homicide.

He had other cases he was working, so he put the report about the missing woman aside. When his desk phone rang five minutes later, Morrisey knew even before he answered it that the body of the missing young woman had been found.

He also knew he was going to be in for a long day.


Written for today’s one-word prompt, “zoo.”