JusJoJan — Magazines

I used to subscribe to a lot of magazines. Time, Newsweek, BusinessWeek, PC Magazine, InfoWorld, Sports Illustrated, People, and, yes, I admit that, way back when, I had a subscription to Playboy.

I also have had home delivery of the local daily newspaper for as long as I can remember. I’ve always enjoyed starting my day reading the paper while sipping my first cup of coffee before starting whatever activities and adventures awaited me as the day unfolded.

But that was the way it used to be. Today, I get most of my news on my iPhone’s newsfeed or on cable news shows. Yes, I still get the morning newspaper, primarily for the sports and business sections for me and the crossword and Sudoku puzzles for my wife. But I no longer subscribe to any magazine except for one: The Week.76D5E807-9DEE-4D19-904B-2AA2CB53F29CAs its tagline suggest, The Week provides “All you need to know about everything that matters.” And it does so concisely. The current issue has only 42 pages and can be fully digested in a single day!

The Week is also nonpartisan. It generally provides all sides of the news in an objective way. So Republican or Democrat, liberal or conservative, there’s something for everyone. I recommend the magazine to everyone.


Written for Linda G. Hill’s JusJoJan prompt, where the word, contributed by Willow, is “subscribe.” Also for Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (paper).

Negative Partisanship

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The following short commentary, based upon a longer article in politico.com, appeared in this week’s issue of The Week magazine (theweek.com).

I’m copying and pasting it here for those who don’t subscribe to the Week or who don’t read politico.com, because I think it is an accurate reflection of politics in America today.

“Donald Trump thrives amid all the chaos because of the rise of a phenomenon that we have labeled ‘negative partisanship.’ Over the past few decades, American politics has become like a bitter sports rivalry, in which the parties hang together mainly out of sheer hatred of the other team, rather than a shared sense of purpose. Republicans might not love the president, but they absolutely loathe his Democratic adversaries. And it’s also true of Democrats, who might be consumed by their internal feuds over foreign policy and the proper role of government were it not for Trump. Negative partisanship explains nearly everything in American politics today.”

The full article was written by Alan Abramowitz and Steve Webster in Politico.com and can be viewed here.