Who Won The Week — 03/13/22

The idea behind Who Won the Week is to give you the opportunity to select who (or what) you think “won” this past week. Your selection can be anyone or anything — politicians, celebrities, athletes, authors, bloggers, your friends or family members, books, movies, TV shows, businesses, organizations, whatever.

If you want to participate, write your own post designating who you think won the week and why you think they deserve your nod. Then link back to this post and tag you post with FWWTW.

This week’s Who Won the Week Winner is Texas state judge Amy Clark Meachum, who issued an temporary injunction against a policy ordered last month by Governor Greg Abbott calling for investigations of parents with transgender children for possible child abuse. I wrote about that in this post.

The ruling stemmed from a legal challenge by the parents of a 16-year-old transgender girl. Her family was among the first to be investigated by the state’s Department of Family and Protective Services. Judge Meachum said the governor’s actions, and those of the agency, “violate separation of powers by impermissibly encroaching into the legislative domain.” She said there was a “substantial likelihood” that plaintiffs would prevail after a trial on the merits because the governor’s order was “unconstitutional.”

The ruling applied to all investigations initiated across Texas under Mr. Abbott’s order, which the court said could no longer be enforced pending a trial on the issue, set for July.

While it seems that sanity and reason has actually prevailed in Texas, at least in this instance, the Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said, “So we’re definitely going to appeal that and take it to the Texas Supreme Court. I have no doubt that the governor has the authority to do what he’s doing.”

Well, for the time being, let’s applaud Judge Meachum for her rational response to an irrational order by a partisan hack who sits in the Texas Governor’s mansion.

What about you? Who (or what) do you think won the week?

Raising Transgender Kids is Child Abuse…in Texas

Texas governor Greg Abbott. Photo credit: Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Texas officials have begun investigating parents of transgender adolescents for possible child abuse. According to the New York Times, parents who provide their transgender teenagers with puberty-suppressing drugs or other medically accepted treatments — which doctors describe as gender-affirming care — could be investigated for child abuse.

A directive from Texas’ Governor Abbott requires state agencies to investigate reports of transgender youth receiving gender-affirming care as child abuse. And it’s not only the parents of transgender teens who are at risk. Abbott warned that educators, medical professionals, and others who don’t report alleged abuse could face consequences. Seriously?

The decision to redefine all treatment for minors experiencing gender dysphoria as “abuse” contradicts the advice of the largest and most established state and national medical groups, including the American Medical Association, the American Psychiatric Association, and the American Academy of Pediatrics. These groups all support providing age appropriate, individualized care for children experiencing gender dysphoria.

What Texas is doing is targeting transgender youth, their parents, and their health care providers for political gain. Is this what America, the land of the free and the home of the brave, has come to? Apparently so, at least in Texas.

Texas, WTF?

In Southlake, Texas, Gina Peddy, the Carroll Independent School District’s executive director of curriculum and instruction, advised teachers last week that if they have a book about the Holocaust in their classroom, they should also offer students access to a book from an “opposing” perspective.

What is an “opposing perspective” when it comes to the Holocaust? Would that be the Nazi perspective that the genocide of millions of European Jews during World War II was a good thing? Or would it be that the Holocaust was fake news and never actually happened?

Peddy, referring to a new Texas law that requires teachers to present multiple perspectives when discussing “widely debated and currently controversial” issues, told teachers to “make sure that if you have a book on the Holocaust, that you have one that has an opposing, that has other perspectives.”

“How do you oppose the Holocaust?” one teacher asked in response.

“Believe me,” Peddy said. “That’s come up.”

This new Texas law requires teachers to provide “balanced perspectives” not just during classroom instruction, but in the books that are available to students in class during free time.

One teacher said, “There are no children’s books that show the ‘opposing perspective’ of the Holocaust or the ‘opposing perspective’ of slavery. Are we supposed to get rid of all of the books on those subjects?”

But what can you expect from Texas, which now has the most restrictive abortion law in the nation. That law allows any private individual to sue abortion providers or those who aid or abet abortions in violation of the law. Successful litigants can collect at least $10,000. It basically makes bounty hunters out of “concerned citizens” who rat out anyone who in any way assists or aids a woman to have an abortion — even if the pregnancy is the result of rape or incest — after six weeks of her pregnancy. Most women don’t even know they’re pregnant within the first six weeks.

Seriously, Texas, WTF?

Don’t Hold Your Breath

“Did you get your invitation to the Cloudscape Conference in Austin?” Brad asked Jim.

“Yeah, but I don’t think I’m going to attend this year,” Jim answered.

“Why not? You always attend,” Brad said. “And last year’s conference was held over Zoom due to COVID. This year’s conference will be live again, and I heard it’s going to be quite the spectacle.”

“Maybe so,” Jim said, “but I don’t yet feel comfortable getting on a plane and being inside a convention center crowded with people, especially in Texas where all those assholes are refusing to get vaccinated or even to wear face masks.”

“I hear you, buddy,” Brad said, “but the conference isn’t until December and maybe by then, the virus will be gone.”

“Now you’re sounding like Trump back in early 2020 when he claimed the virus would miraculously disappear,” Jim said.

“Whatever,” Brad said. “But you have until early November to register, so we should keep checking. Maybe by then the virus will actually dissipate and you’ll be able to go.”

Jim shook his head. “Don’t hold your breath, my friend.”


Written for these daily prompts: Ragtag Daily Prompt (cloudscape), Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (attend), Word of the Day Challenge (spectacle), The Daily Spur (comfortable), and My Vivid Blog (check).

Who Won the Week — 9/5/2021

The idea behind Who Won the Week is to give you the opportunity to select who (or what) you think “won” this past week. Your selection can be anyone or anything — politicians, celebrities, athletes, authors, bloggers, your friends or family members, books, movies, TV shows, businesses, organizations, whatever.

I will be posting this prompt on Sunday mornings (my time). If you want to participate, write your own post designating who you think won the week and why you think they deserve your nod. Then link back to this post and tag you post with FWWTW.

My pick for who won the week this week is no one and nothing. As far as I’m concerned, it’s been a pretty shitty week. Between what’s happening with women’s rights and voting rights in Texas…

…wildfires engulfing the western states, massive hurricanes devastating the southern states, and deadly flash flooding killing people in the northeast…

…the surge in COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths, while people stubbornly and selfishly refuse to wear masks and would rather self-treat for COVID using horse and cow dewormers rather than getting vaccinated…

…and the continuing chaos in Afghanistan…

…I’m depressed and exhausted and see very little to celebrate. Maybe there will be something or someone to celebrate next week.

What about you? Who (or what) do you think won the week?