Fandango’s Provocative Question #4

FPQEach week I will pose what I think is a provocative question. By provocative, I don’t mean a question that will cause annoyance or anger. Nor do I mean a question intended to arouse sexual desire or interest.

What I do mean is a question that is likely to get you to think, to be creative, and to provoke a response. Hopefully a positive response.

This week’s provocative question came up while I was watching “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” a few weeks ago. Colbert was talking with astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson and mentioned that in college he was taking a philosophy course and the final exam consisted of just one question:

“Is it better to know or is it better to not know?”

If you choose to participate, write a post with your response to the question. Once you are done, tag your post with #FPQ and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

And most important, have fun.

One-Liner Wednesday — The Master of the Understatement

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“This might come as news to you, but sometimes he makes things up.”

Jake Trapper to Stephen Colbert

Jake Tapper is an American journalist and author, Chief Washington Correspondent for CNN, anchor of the CNN weekday television news show “The Lead with Jake Tapper,” and anchor of the CNN Sunday morning political affairs program “State of the Union.”

Stephen Colbert is an American comedian, writer, producer, actor, and television host. He is best known for hosting the satirical Comedy Central program “The Colbert Report” and the CBS talk program “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.”

The quote at the top of this post is something Jake Tapper said to Stephen Colbert a few nights ago on “The Late Show.” Of course, the “he” Tapper was referring to was Donald Trump.

I said to my wife as we were watching the show, “Jake Tapper is the master of the understatement.”


Written for Linda G. Hill’s One-Liner Wednesday prompt.

Repost — Facts Versus Truth

My blogging friend, James, started a comment he posted on one of my rants yesterday about the Senate Judiciary Committee’s “he said/she said” hearing yesterday, with this quote:

Archaeology is the search for fact … not truth. If it’s truth you’re interested in, Dr. Tyree’s philosophy class is right down the hall.” -Dr. Henry (Indiana) Jones Jr.

Of course, my post and James’ comment were in the context of the testimonies yesterday of Christine Blasey Ford and Brett Kavanaugh. What James said was, “What we’re looking for is (or should be) facts. What we might have to settle for is truth, but I don’t see how we’re going to get it.”

The Indiana Jones quote and what Jim wrote reminded me of my fourth or fifth post when I started this blog. And so, since it basically went unread when I posted it, I thought it might be a good time to shed some light on it.


Facts and TruthWhen I first read Faulkner’s quote (above), I was perplexed. I had always considered “facts” and “truth” to be synonyms. Even the definitions of the two words cross-reference one another:

Fact: something that actually exists; reality; truth.
Truth: conformity with fact or reality; a verified or indisputable fact.

Facts are used as proof of what is undeniably “the truth,” but are these words truly interchangeable or do they actually have different meanings and usage?

I was curious enough about the similarities and differences between these two words to do some Google research. And I learned that not everyone believes that they are synonymous. Some folks actually differentiate between the them using diametrically opposed logic.

One site argued that facts can be fleeting, enduring for but a moment. For example, the “fact” of someone’s location on a fast-moving train changes every instant. Truth, on the other hand is a more enduring type of fact, this source claimed.

Another site argued that if it’s a fact now, it will be a fact in the future, whereas truth is more temporal. Facts indicate a universal truth, while truth depends upon temporal circumstances. For example, that the sun appears to always rise in the east and set in the west is a fact. It will never change.

I found an interesting site, differencebetween.net, which provided four facts (or truths?) about facts and truths:

  • Facts are more objective when compared to the more subjective truths.
  • Facts are more permanent when compared to the more temporary truths.
  • Facts exist in reality, whereas truths are usually the things that one believes to be true, or the things that are true in the current situation.
  • Facts can also answer the ‘where,’ ‘when,’ and ‘how’ questions, whereas truths answer the ‘why’ question.

Truthiness

And then there is “truthiness,” a word first coined by Stephen Colbert a dozen years ago. Like when Bill Maher says, “I don’t know it for a fact…I just know it’s true,” truthiness is the quality of seeming to be true based upon one’s intuition, opinion, or perception without regard to logic or factual evidence. It’s when someone feels, believes, or wishes that something is true even when it is not supported by the facts.

So with both facts and truth under siege by Donald Trump and his surrogates, and with “alternative facts” and “false truths” being promulgated, I  have to wonder if Faulkner’s statement was extremely prescient and sadly reflective of where we are in the second decade of the 21st century.

So what do you think? Are the words “fact” and “truth” synonyms? Do you use them interchangeably in your oral and written communications? Or do these two words, as Faulkner believes, have little to do with each another?

And in today’s world, where truthiness means more to a lot of people than either facts or truth, does it even matter anymore?

One-Liner Wednesday — Truthiness

“May you only hear from others what you’ve already been telling yourself.”

President Donald J. Trump

Okay, I lied. As much as that sounds like something Donald Trump would say, he didn’t say it. The quote came from Jordan Klepper, comedian and host of The Opposition with Jordan Klepper, a show on Comedy Central, which, sadly, was just canceled.39BC413A-F482-495E-B48B-8703064A11C8But doesn’t wanting to hear only what he already believes sound like Trump’s modus operandi? He labels anything he doesn’t like as “fake news” and calls those journalists who don’t write positive things about him “enemies of the American people.”

Unfortunately, only wanting to hear from others what you’ve already been telling yourself is not unique to Donald Trump and Jordan Klepper. And it doesn’t make much of a difference if you’re on the left or the right. We are such a divided nation right now that most of us tend to read, watch, or listen to whatever it is that reinforces our own partisan positions.

I refuse to watch Fox News. I only rarely watch CNN. I get most of my news from MSNBC. Why? Because they tell me what I am more receptive to hearing and more likely to accept.

About a dozen or so years ago, Stephen Colbert coined the word “truthiness.” Truthiness is the quality of seeming to be true based upon one’s intuition, opinion, or perception without regard to logic or factual evidence. It’s when someone feels, believes, or wishes that something is true even when it is not supported by the facts.

Truthiness is very similar to a concept espoused by comedian Bill Maher when he says, “I don’t know it for a fact…I just know it’s true.”

So fess up, people. How many of you really only want to hear from others what you’ve already been telling yourself?

Come on. It’s America’s birthday. Stand and be counted!


Written for today’s One-Liner Wednesday prompt from Linda G. Hill.