Linear Thinking

0C8DBED3-C2C3-4BA2-8A82-D76E5702E8FD“I don’t recommend that you carry that large of a load this coming semester,” the guidance counselor said.

“Listen,” Aaron said, “I’ve given this whole curriculum a lot of thought. As they say, the shortest distance between two points is a straight line. My plan is to graduate in three years instead of four and to do that I need to take all of my classes in a very deliberate, sequential manner. I’m simply applying the concept of linear thinking to my decision.”

“But college is not only about going to classes and academic achievement,” the guidance counselor said. “Don’t you want to participate in any extracurricular activities? And what about a social life?”

“I have neither the time nor the interest in wasting my time with trash talk,” Aaron said. “It’s my conviction that my focus has to be on academics and my goal of graduating in three years.”

The guidance counselor sighed. “Well, Aaron,” she said, “I can tell that you process a great intelligence, but I fear that you’re demonstrating a serious lack of wisdom.”


Written for these one-word prompts: Ragtag Daily Prompt (recommend), Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (carry), Scotts Daily Prompt (linear), Weekly Prompts (trash talk), and Word of the Day (conviction). I also snuck in a not so provocative response for my Fandango’s Provocative Question Prompt (intelligence or wisdom).

J is for Juggling

I’ve spent most of my life juggling stuff. I don’t mean literally juggling objects, as in throwing three or more plates, bowling pins, or flaming batons up into the air and catching them. I mean juggling everyday activities of daily living like school, sports, work, family, social life, reading, writing, and the like.

I had to work my way through college. So for most of the time during my undergraduate school, I was working at least part-time and going to school full-time. Once I got into graduate school, my time was spent working a full-time job during the day and going to classes at nights and on weekends. And for my own sanity and well being, I also tried to squeeze in some kind of social life.

After I got married and had kids, I found myself juggling my time between my job, my wife, and my kids. After my kids grew up and moved out of the house, I was still doing that delicate balancing act between keeping my wife happy and my boss happy.

(Actually, upon review, that last sentence seems kinda kinky. What I meant was keeping my wife happy with respect to my duties as her husband and my boss happy with respect to my job duties. There was funny business going on at work.)

And now that I’m retired and have taken up blogging, it’s a matter of juggling my waking hours between spending quality time with my wife, walking our dog, reading books, watching TV, and writing and reading blog posts.

I suppose that juggling is something that all of us do most of our lives and will continue to do until that inevitable time when there is no longer a need to juggle.