FOWC with Fandango — Random

FOWCWelcome to August 2, 2019 and to Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (aka, FOWC). It’s designed to fill the void after WordPress bailed on its daily one-word prompt.

I will be posting each day’s word just after midnight Pacific Time (US).

Today’s word is “random.”

Write a post using that word. It can be prose, poetry, fiction, non-fiction. It can be any length. It can be just a picture or a drawing if you want. No holds barred, so to speak.

Once you are done, tag your post with #FOWC and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

The issue with pingbacks not showing up seems to have been resolved, but you might check to confirm that your pingback is there. If not, please manually add your link in the comments.

And be sure to read the posts of other bloggers who respond to this prompt. You will marvel at their creativity.

Battery Boost

F45E8A07-0361-4B68-BC57-A157667DF79CAccording to my iPhone’s Screen Time tracker, I average between 9-10 hours a day looking at my iPhone’s screen. You might think that’s a lot, but while I do have a laptop, I hardly ever use it. And I don’t have an iPad. So I use my iPhone for everything connected, including WordPress.

In fact, about two-thirds of my screen time is spent on my blog — writing posts, responding to comments, and reading and commenting on the posts of others. When not on WordPress, I am checking my newsfeed, using Google to search the internet, sending and receiving emails and text messages, checking the weather, reading books on my Kindle app, and playing solitaire while watching the news on TV.

My iPhone, an 8 Plus, is almost two years old and its battery life ain’t what it used to be. Most days, by around three or four in the afternoon, the battery icon in the upper right corner of my screen turns red, a sign that my battery is down to the last 20% of its charge. But I’ve still got another 6-7 hours of awake time. I don’t want to put my iPhone down for two of those hours while it’s charging.

So I bought a battery charging case for my iPhone. Not only does it protect my iPhone, like any other case will do, but if I press a tiny little button on the back of the case, it starts charging my iPhone without it leaving my hand or me having to be near an electrical outlet to plug it in to get the battery charged. The charging case doubles my iPhone’s battery life. And it only cost $35 on Amazon!

Yeah! Now I can spend even more uninterrupted time with my eyes glued to my iPhone’s screen. Life is great, no?

In Other Words — Random Intents

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Random thoughts

Random words

Random acts

Random deeds

With random intents, good or bad.


Written for the In Other Words prompt from Patricia’s Place. The challenge this week is to write a story or poem of five lines or fewer using the word “random.”

Friday Fictioneers — Guilt Trip

694B803F-F277-496A-B4E4-7C02AF7F48A9It was supposed to be a simple matter. Kidnap a little rich girl, collect the large ransom, and let her go. No harm done. A happy ending for all. He’d have money, a mere a drop in the bucket for her wealthy parents, and the girl would be back safe at home.

But the scared little girl ran from him, fell off a bridge, and broke her neck. He buried her under the bridge, put rocks on the top of the small grave, and then, unable to cope with his guilt, drowned himself in the shallow stream beneath the bridge.

(100 words)


Written for the Friday Fictioneers prompt from Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. Photo credit: Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.

SoCS — Point Taken

CBDA963C-B68B-40D0-B4B5-97B4219E0024Linda G. Hill’s Stream of Consciousness Saturday prompt this week is less of a word than an action.  She wrote, “Your prompt for Stream of Consciousness Saturday is ‘point.’ Open a book on your lap, close your eyes, and put your finger on the page. Whatever you land on, whether it be a word, a phrase, or a sentence, write about it.”

This challenge proved, um, challenging for me because I no longer have any physical books. Every book I currently own is an ebook that is in my Kindle app on my iPhone. So I couldn’t exactly open a book on my lap, close my eyes, and put a finger on the page, could I?

Instead, I opened up the Kindle app, handed my iPhone to my wife, and asked her to randomly pick a book, open it up, pick a page in that book, and then pick a word, phrase, or sentence on that page, highlight it, and copy it. She did, and I pasted it below:

“One day he rose from his arm-chair, and went to his library in search of a book.”

This sentence came from the Victor Hugo classic, Les Misérables. It can be found in “loc 442 of 27004.” That means it’s fairly early in the book. In the first one percent, actually. I can’t tell you what the page number equivalent would be in the print edition because I don’t have a print edition of the book.

I asked my wife why she chose that particular sentence to copy. She told me that she thought it was apropos for the prompt that asked us to select a book and to choose a line from it. And she also thought that it held some irony in that I don’t have a physical library with actual books, but instead have a virtual library with electric books. Very clever, my wife is.

As to the context of the specific sentence she selected from the book, I have no idea. It’s been quite a few years since I read Les Misérables, and I’m pretty sure I’d have to go back and read at least a chapter or two before that sentence to figure out who “he” is and why he went in search of a book.

But I don’t want to do that. So instead, I am writing about the process of finding a random sentence in a random book so that I can respond Linda’s rather random prompt in a randomly stream of consciousness way.