One-Liner Wednesday — Politics and Hatred

“Politics, as a practice, whatever its professions, has always been the systematic organization of hatreds.”

Henry Adams, American historian, descended from two U.S. Presidents

Henry Adams died in 1918, and I find that this quote from him was incredibly prescient, given when he said it. It’s certainly an accurate reflection of the hatred displayed in politics in America today.

And if that isn’t controversial enough for you, let me suggest that if you were to substitute the word “religion” for the word “politics,” the statement is equally as true.


Written for Linda G. Hill’s One-Liner Wednesday prompt.

Fandango’s Provocative Question #37 Revisited

Note: Because I am participating in the A to Z blogging challenge this month, I will not be posting any new provocative question until May. Instead, I will be revisiting some previous provocative questions that you might have missed. This one was originally posted on August 21, 2019 and can be found here. Please feel free to respond to it if you haven’t already.

FPQ

Welcome once again to Fandango’s Provocative Question. Each week I will pose what I think is a provocative question for your consideration.

By provocative, I don’t mean a question that will cause annoyance or anger. Nor do I mean a question intended to arouse sexual desire or interest.

What I do mean is a question that is likely to get you to think, to be creative, and to provoke a response. Hopefully a positive response.

For this week’s provocative question, I am concerned about how partisan just about everybody appears to be. We seem to have reached the point where everyone behaves as if “you’re either with me or you’re against me,” and there is no middle ground.

I remember that there was a time not that long ago when people could disagree about specific issues without animosity, but those days seem to be over, particularly in the areas of politics and religion.

So my question to you this week is simply this:

Is it possible anymore to disagree without being disagreeable?

If you choose to participate, write a post with your response to the question. Once you are done, tag your post with #FPQ and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments. But remember to check to confirm that your pingback or your link shows up in the comments.

Fandango’s Flashback Friday — April 8th

Wouldn’t you like to expose your newer readers to some of your earlier posts that they might never have seen? Or remind your long term followers of posts that they might not remember? Each Friday I will publish a post I wrote on this exact date in a previous year.

How about you? Why don’t you reach back into your own archives and highlight a post that you wrote on this very date in a previous year? You can repost your Friday Flashback post on your blog and pingback to this post. Or you can just write a comment below with a link to the post you selected.

If you’ve been blogging for less than a year, go ahead and choose a post that you previously published on this day (the 8th) of any month within the past year and link to that post in a comment.


This was originally posted on April 8, 2018.

The Personification of Thwart

When I saw today’s one-word prompt, “thwart,” the name of the Senate Majority Leader, Mitch McConnell, immediately came to mind. McConnell’s primary mission when Obama was President was to thwart everything Obama did.

Obama was elected in 2008. When McConnell became the Majority Leader in 2010, he said that his “number one priority is making sure President Obama’s a one-term president.” Fortunately for America, he failed.

In 2016, McConnell said, “One of my proudest moments was when I told Obama, ‘You will not fill this Supreme Court vacancy.’”

As justification for thwarting Obama’s Constitutional right to appoint a Supreme Court Justice after the sudden death of Antonin Scalia in early 2016, McConnell said, “The American people‎ should have a voice in the selection of their next Supreme Court Justice. Therefore, this vacancy should not be filled until we have a new President.”

But in January of 2017, McConnell changed his tune. When newly elected Donald Trump nominated U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals judge Neil Gorsuch to fill Scalia’s vacancy, Democratic senators vowed a fight, insisting on keeping the rule that a majority of 60 votes be required for confirmation. That’s when the man who prevented Obama from filling the Scalia’s vacancy said, “Apparently there’s yet a new standard now, which is not to confirm a Supreme Court nominee at all. I think that’s something the American people simply will not tolerate.”

Is this not the height of hypocrisy? And that is why I consider Mitch McConnell to be the personification of thwart.

Who would get your vote?

Fandango’s Flashback Friday — March 4th

Wouldn’t you like to expose your newer readers to some of your earlier posts that they might never have seen? Or remind your long term followers of posts that they might not remember? Each Friday I will publish a post I wrote on this exact date in a previous year.

How about you? Why don’t you reach back into your own archives and highlight a post that you wrote on this very date in a previous year? You can repost your Friday Flashback post on your blog and pingback to this post. Or you can just write a comment below with a link to the post you selected.

If you’ve been blogging for less than a year, go ahead and choose a post that you previously published on this day (the 4th) of any month within the past year and link to that post in a comment.


This was originally posted on March 4, 2018.

Another Trump Quote of the Day

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“He’s now president for life, president for life. And he’s great. And look, he was able to do that. I think it’s great. Maybe we’ll have to give that a shot someday.

Donald Trump has already revealed that he will be running for re-election in 2020, making clear that he is planning to cling to power for the maximum eight years. But why limit his reign to just two terms?

After hearing that the ruling Communist Party in China announced that leader Xi Jinping was eliminating the two-term limit for presidency, meaning he could rule indefinitely, Trump told Republican donors at a luncheon at Mar-a-Lago yesterday that he thought that was great and actually suggested that we, in the U.S., will have to “give that a shot someday.”

Sure, his surrogates, including his despicable press secretary, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, will claim that he was just making a joke. But here’s a man who still denies that Russia meddled in the 2016 elections and is doing nothing to protect against further Russian meddling in this fall’s midterm elections.

He has refused to place additional sanctions on Russia even though those sanctions were overwhelmingly passed by Congress. He has his head so far up Vladimir Putin’s butt that he will never say even one negative word about the Russian dictator.

He is breaking all political and social norms, wants his political adversaries to be investigated by “his” Department of Justice, denigrates the FBI, and has given enormous political powers and influence to his daughter and corrupt son-in-law, even though neither can earn a top secret clearance from “his” FBI.

How much clearer can it be that Donald Trump and his Republican cronies on his cabinet and in the GOP-controlled Congress are tearing at the very fabric of our American democracy?


Written for today’s one-word prompt, “fabric.”