One-Liner Wednesday — Curiosity and Imagination

39261294-2CB6-40A7-B8BA-1A903454595F“That adage about ‘write what you know’ is basically the opposite of the way I function. I write about what I’m curious to find out.”

Jennifer Egan, American novelist

Okay, yes, this one-liner is actually a two-liner. But it’s no less an interesting message. A lot of truly great writers have advised wannabe writers to write about what they know. Makes sense, right?

But as Jennifer Egan suggests, if you write about something you’re curious to know, you’ll research it and will, therefore, end up writing about what you know. That, too, makes sense.

Although, I might modify Jennifer’s quote slightly. Because if I had to personally know about everything I wanted to write about, I wouldn’t have that much to write about. So instead, I’d say, “Write about what you’re curious to find out…or whatever your imagination conjures up.”

Written for today’s One-Liner Wednesday prompt from Linda G. Hill. Image credit: Lysons_editions (

One-Liner Wednesday — Searching for a Plot


“My life has a superb cast, but I can’t figure out the plot.”

Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant
British author and syndicated cartoonist

As a wannabe novelist, I can relate to this quotation. In my handful of attempts at writing the “Great American Novel,” I seem to be able to conjure up a whole cast of interesting, unique, provocative, and compelling characters. But then I get all turned around and mostly lost trying to figure out what to do with them. I get bogged down while attempting to develop the plot arc and end up abandoning my characters without reaching a destination.

Well, they say one’s journey is more important than one’s destination. So I’m going to go with that as my excuse for not being able to give my cast a decent plot in which to strut their stuff.

Written for this week’s One-Liner Wednesday prompt from Linda G. Hill.

One-Liner Wednesday — Getting Warmer


“I think that there’s assumptions made that because the climate is warming, that that necessarily is a bad thing.”

Scott Pruitt, head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Climate change denier Pruitt went on to say, “Do we really know what the ideal surface temperature should be in the year 2100, in the year 2018? That’s fairly arrogant for us to think that we know exactly what it should be in 2100.”

He’s right. What difference does it make what the surface temperature will be in the year 2100? Almost all of us will be dead in 82 years and the human race will likely be extinct by then as a result of global warming.

And this is the man that Donald Trump chose to head up the EPA, the federal agency whose mission it is supposed to be to protect human health and the environment.

Scott Pruitt, just another one of the swamp creatures of the Trump administration.

Written for today’s One-Liner Wednesday prompt from Linda G. Hill.