Sweet Home Alabama

F6C376A4-0FDD-44D8-87E9-16AC1B5DB833Donald Trump is so insecure that when he is caught saying something wrong, he goes to extreme lengths to make it seem like he didn’t make a mistake.

Over the weekend, Trump tweeted that, in addition to Florida, “South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama, will most likely be hit (much) harder than anticipated.”

Trump suggested the same thing about Alabama in comments to reporters on Sunday on the White House South Lawn. “We don’t know where it’s going to hit, seems to be going to Florida, now it should be going to Georgia, the Carolinas. Alabama to get a bit of a beat down. You’ll be learning more probably over the course of the next 24 hours.”

In fact, even after forecasters predicted Dorian would make a northward turn over the weekend, Trump insisted three times on Sunday that the hurricane would hit Alabama (and Mar-a-Lago).

In an unprecedented move, the National Weather Service tweeted out a correction to Trump’s misinformation about Alabama. “Alabama will NOT see any impacts from #Dorian, We repeat, no impacts from Hurricane #Dorian will be felt across Alabama. The system will remain too far east.”

But rather than admitting that he misspoke, Trump did something extraordinary. At a hurricane briefing earlier today, Trump, determined to prove himself right, showed an outdated forecast for Hurricane Dorian that seemingly corresponded with his incorrect prediction about Alabama getting hit by the hurricane that he had made several days before.

“We had an original chart that it was going to be hitting Florida directly, maybe I could just see that,” Trump instructed one of the officials before showing the chart to the camera. The chart he displayed (see the photo at the top of this post) indicated that it was made around 11 a.m. ET last Thursday, making it about six days old.

But when I looked closely at the chart he showed, something jumped out at me.AFD1FA3B-EB1E-4C16-92C0-4C89288F55E1It looks as if someone took a black Sharpie and extended the NWS track to reach into southeast Alabama. Look closely. It does, doesn’t it?

You know who likes to use a Sharpie? Trump does. He seems to sign every one of his executive orders with one. And he autographs his supporters’ MAGA hats with a Sharpie.

So I don’t know this for sure, but I think someone (Trump?) took a Sharpie and manually drew a semicircle extending the NWS storm track into Alabama in order to prove that he didn’t get it wrong when he tweeted and repeated that Alabama was going to get “a beat down” from Hurricane Dorian.

Did Trump just show a bogus, altered map to support his misstatements? As I said, I don’t know for sure. I’m just sayin’.

One-Liner Wednesday — Would or Wouldn’t

“I don’t see any reason why it would be Russia.”

Donald Trump in Helsinki on July 16, 2018

Donald Trump now claims to have misspoken on Monday at the press conference after his one-on-one meeting with Vladimir Putin in Helsinki. When asked by a journalist about whether he thought that Russia had interfered with the U.S. presidential election in 2016, what Trump actually said was, “I don’t see any reason why it would be Russia.”

But when he returned Monday from the summit, Trump said that he “realized there is some need for clarification” about his remarks on Russian interference in the election.

“In a key sentence in my remarks” Trump pointed out, “I said the word ‘would’ instead of ‘wouldn’t.’”

“The sentence should have been: ‘I don’t see any reason why it wouldn’t be Russia,’” he said. “Sort of a double negative.”

And that sort of reminded me of another mix-up of the words would and wouldn’t Trump previously made, which mix-up was perfectly captured in this Facebook post I came across:

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Written for Linda G. Hill’s One-Liner Wednesday prompt.