Return on Investment

B74D0A3D-933E-4CB4-9650-207B08D161CDAs David and Diane were checking into the fancy hotel, the bellhop approached them. “Sir,” he said to David, “I’ll take your baggage up to room 1614 for you.”

Diane looked up at David. “How did you afford such a ritzy hotel?” she asked. “It must cost a small fortune.”

“My greatest strength is finding great deals,” David said.

Diana snuggled up to David and said, “Well, I wouldn’t say that’s your greatest strength, babe. I hope you’ll demonstrate that for me later tonight.” She gave him a big hug and kiss and asked, “But seriously, how did you manage to get us into this place?”

“Okay, I guess I can tell you my secret,” David said. “I invested in one of those two-hour lunch things a few weeks ago. You have to sit through a lengthy sales pitch to buy into a time sharing vacation resort property.”

“Seriously?” a surprised Diana said. “Did you fall for that crap and buy into a time share?”

“Of course not,” David said. “But that two-hour investment of my time got me a free lunch and this bundle that includes two nights at this fancy hotel plus two breakfasts and two dinners at the hotel’s restaurant.”

“Sounds like you got a good return on your two-hour investment,” Diana said.

“Indeed,” David said. “Now take my arm and let’s head up to room 1614, where our baggage awaits us.”


Written for these daily prompts: Ragtag Daily Prompt (baggage), Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (ritzy), Word of the Day Challenge (strength), and Your Daily Word Prompt (bundle).

Friday Fictioneers — Alone

8982DA0D-6588-4582-867A-CEA9A15517B4Dressed and ready for some coffee, Mark took the elevator to the hotel’s meeting room level on the third floor. He found the coffee station and poured himself a cup.

No one was around, which Mark found strange, given that the first meeting was scheduled to start in ten minutes. He took the elevator to the first floor and saw that not a soul was there. No guests, no one at the checkout counter, no doormen.

He stepped outside and saw that the streets were empty of cars and people. Totally alone, Mark wondered where everyone had gone.

(98 words)


Written for Rochelle Wisoff-Fields’ Friday Fictioneers. Photo credit: Yvette Prior.

#FOWC — Father and Son

C0F7A0FC-8902-4AE7-A6B1-2A775DE0F3F1“Why do I always feel like you’re trying to compete with me?” Danny asked his father.

“Son,” Danny’s father said. “Life is a zero-sum game. If you don’t win, you lose. It’s as simple as that. You can’t afford to make any accommodation for your competitor.”

“I’m your son, for crissake,” Danny said. “You should be encouraging me, supporting me, not competing with me, not denigrating me.”

“Son,” Danny’s father admonished, “You need to stop being so insipid. “There are times that you seem to move like a caterpillar. You need to put some zing in your step.”

Danny was silent for a moment, contemplating what his father had said. “Dad, you’re a successful, wealthy lawyer. I can’t compete with that. I don’t want the same things you want. Danny grabbed his coat and started to leave.

“Where are you going?” his father asked him.

“I got a job as a bartender at the new hotel downtown,” Danny said, slamming the door behind him.

“He’s such a loser,” his father muttered.


Written for Teresa’s Three Things Challenge, where the three things are caterpillar, silent, and hotel. Also for Fandango’s One-Word Challenge, “compete,” Your Daily Word Prompt, “accommodation,” the Word of the Day Challenge, “insipid, and for the Ragtag Daily Prompt, “zing.”

Happy Anniversary

ABC15485-4D66-48CD-8F8C-89357D324357The first thing that impressed Ann when she and her husband walked into the posh, downtown hotel room were the beautiful lace doilies on the desk and the bedside tables. That was until Michael called her over to the window and told her to look out.

“Oh my God,” Ann exclaimed. “This is stunning. Look at the city with the twinkling lights from the skyscrapers peaking from behind the wispy, low-hanging clouds. This hotel is some discovery,” she said to Michael, squeezing his hand tightly.

“I wanted to surprise you on this, our fifth wedding anniversary,” Michael said, bending down slightly to give Ann a kiss. “And best of all, I scored great tickets for tonight.”

“Oh, Michael,” Ann squealed, “I’ve always wanted to see a Broadway show! Which show?”

“Well, it’s just a little off Broadway,” Michael admitted.

“Oh, off-Broadway,” Ann said. “Well, that’s cool. I understand that there are some very avant-garde shows that are off-Broadway.”

“Yeah, well it not exactly a show,” Michael said. “I got floor seats for the Knicks game.”

Ann looked at her husband and said, “You’re taking me to a basketball game for our anniversary? Seriously?”

“It’s my anniversary, too, you know,” Michael said.

“And your last one with me,” Ann said.


Written for Teresa’s two prompts, Three Things Challenge, where the things are discovery, lace, and basketball, and for her Worth A Thousand Words photo prompt. Photo credit: carloyuen @ pixabay.com.

Friday Fictioneers — Better Days

E5F2D963-BE5C-45C4-BE0C-967413CF627F“Are you sure, señor, that that is where you want me to take you?” The water taxi driver asked before leaving the dock.

“Yes,” Michael said, squeezing his wife’s hand. “The Hotel Henry Berrisford. Why do you ask?”

“Well, señor,” the driver said, “that place is not in the best part of town.”

“Nonsense,” Michael responded. “The travel agent assured me that that hotel is the place to stay. We’re here on our second honeymoon.”

The driver pulled the water taxi up to the hotel’s pier. It was very clear to Michael that the hotel had seen better days.

(99 words)


Written for this week’s Friday Fictioneers prompt from Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. Photo credit: JS Brand