One-Liner Wednesday — Learning From History

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“We learn from history that we do not learn from history.”

German philosopher Georg W. F. Hegel 

Hegel lived from 1770 to 1831. Around 200 years later, American business magnate, investor, and philanthropist, Warren Buffet, said “What we learn from history is that people don’t learn from history.”

And then, along the same line, there’s the famous George Santayana quote, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

Or the Winston Churchill version, “Those who fail to learn from history are condemned to repeat it.”

Basically, humans seem not to learn from history or tend not to remember the past, as evidenced by the fact that we tend to make the same mistakes over and over again.

And as Albert Einstein allegedly said, “The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.”


Written for Linda G. Hill’s One-Liner Wednesday and for Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (history).

FOWC with Fandango — History

FOWCWelcome to February 17, 2020 and to Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (aka, FOWC). It’s designed to fill the void after WordPress bailed on its daily one-word prompt.

I will be posting each day’s word just after midnight Pacific Time (US).

Today’s word is “history.”

Write a post using that word. It can be prose, poetry, fiction, non-fiction. It can be any length. It can be just a picture or a drawing if you want. No holds barred, so to speak.

Once you are done, tag your post with #FOWC and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

The issue with pingbacks not showing up seems to have been resolved, but you might check to confirm that your pingback is there. If not, please manually add your link in the comments.

And be sure to read the posts of other bloggers who respond to this prompt. You will marvel at their creativity.

Fandango’s Provocative Question #44

FPQWelcome once again to Fandango’s Provocative Question. Each week I will pose what I think is a provocative question for your consideration. By provocative, I don’t mean a question that will cause annoyance or anger. Nor do I mean a question intended to arouse sexual desire or interest.

What I do mean is a question that is likely to get you to think, to be creative, and to provoke a response. Hopefully a positive response.

You’re probably familiar with this quote from philosopher, essayist, poet, and novelist, George Santayana, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.“ In a 1948 speech to the House of Commons, Winston Churchill changed the quote slightly when he said, “Those who fail to learn from history are condemned to repeat it.“

So, speaking about what you remember about the past or have learned from history, how would you answer this question:

What do you think was (or is) the most significant event in the history of the human race? Please explain.

If you choose to participate, write a post with your response to the question. Once you are done, tag your post with #FPQ and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

The issue with pingbacks not showing up seems to have been resolved, but you might check to confirm that your pingback is there. If not, please manually add your link in the comments.

Set It To Music

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“This is crazy,” Jerry said. “Why do we need to memorize all these dates? Isn’t understanding what took place more important than when they happened?”

“Knowing when events occurred helps you build a timeline for the events, and that also enables you to gain insights into what led up to those events,” his tutor answered. “It helps you put history into perspective.”

“There’s got to be a better way than to memorize all these stupid dates,” Jerry lamented.

“Did you ever hear the song The Battle of New Orleans?” The tutor asked.

“No,” Jerry answered.

“It came out way before you were born,” she said, “but that song enabled me to easily remember when that battle took place and who fought it.” She took out her iPhone, opened up her music app, and started playing that song. They both listened to the lyrics.

In 1814 we took a little trip,
Along with Colonel Jackson down the mighty Mississip.
We took a little bacon and we took a little beans,
And we fought the bloody British in the town of New Orleans.

We fired our guns and the British kept a-comin’
There wasn’t nigh as many as there was a while ago
We fired once more and they begin to runnin’
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico

Before the song ended, an excited Jerry shouted, “Now that’s a great way to learn history.”

“Hmm, it is indeed,” his tutor said.

That night, when her son came home for dinner, she sat him down and said, “Lin-Manuel, I have a great idea about how to help children learn about history.”

And the rest, as they say, is history.


Written for today’s one-word prompt, “memorize.”