The Decade Tag

21976128-71A3-43F4-A745-F9AD19E25B79Sadje, from Keep It Alive, and JP from The Wide-EyedvWander, each tagged me for this thing called “The Decade Tag.” The idea is that, once tagged, we are supposed to share some of our highlights from the past decade and, if we want, a few low points. And to also answer four questions Sadje asked.

So, in 2010 we bought a condo in San Francisco and moved all the way across country from New England to San Francisco. In 2015 we sold our condo and bought a single family home. And in late December of 2019, we bought a home in the suburbs on the East Bay, which we’ll be moving into the first week of February.

What else? I retired at the end of 2016. After taking nearly a two year break from blogging, I started this blog in May 2017. This past year my son got married and his bride quickly got pregnant. My daughter got divorced in 2012, but is very happy with her current boyfriend and housemate, who she met in 2017.

My wife and I have hosted many visitors from back East and elsewhere since we moved to San Francisco, and that’s been fun.

I’d say that, overall, this past decade has been a pretty good one. Well, except for the election of Donald Trump as POTUS in 2016. Come to think of it, that one event has turned the second half of this past decade into a pretty shitty one.

Now for Sadje’s questions.

How are you planning to spend the next decade in improving your health?

Okay, before this next decade is over, I will have become an octogenarian. So my ultimate goal is to still be alive through most of this new decade. I am not sure if I’ll still be around when 2030 arrives, but given the current trajectory of climate change, no one may still be around by 2030.

Have you noticed your tastes in music, literature and clothing change drastically over the last 10 years?

In the early part of this past decade I inexplicably started listening to contemporary pop music. But by the middle of the decade I wised up and went back to my classic rock roots. I don’t read as many books these days as I did a decade ago because there are too many distractions (like blogging). But, otherwise, I haven’t changed much, taste-wise, over the past ten years.

How would you rate your last decade in terms of achieving life goals?

One of my life goals was to retire with a comfortable financial cushion, which I achieved. The other life goal was to stay alive through the decade, and I managed to do that as well. So I suppose I’d give myself a four star rating.

Do you think our planet will be doing well in the next decade?

Not if Trump gets re-elected and the climate change denying Republicans keep the majority in the Senate. If they do, the planet might not survive to see the next decade. Or at least the human race might not survive.

Now I think I’m supposed to tag other bloggers, but I’m not a fan of singling out others, so I’m tagging everyone. Tell us about your decade and answer Sadje’s questions.

Fandango’s Provocative Question #47

FPQWelcome once again to Fandango’s Provocative Question. Each week I will pose what I think is a provocative question for your consideration.

By provocative, I don’t mean a question that will cause annoyance or anger. Nor do I mean a question intended to arouse sexual desire or interest.

What I do mean is a question that is likely to get you to think, to be creative, and to provoke a response. Hopefully a positive response.

There are those who believe that technological advancement a net positive, while others look at it as more of a net negative. Yet most people agree that technological progress is inevitable as long as humans exist and that it can’t be stopped, nor should it be.

There is a controversial concept wrapped around technological advancements called “technological singularity.”FDA6DCE0-1BC0-4605-856A-036827FDF863It’s a hypothetical future point in time when technological growth becomes uncontrollable and irreversible, resulting in unfathomable changes to human civilization.

So my provocative question for you this week is this:

Do you think the singularity will occur? If so, what time frame do you think it will happen in and how will it impact humanity? Alternatively, do you think or care at all about the potential for reaching singularity?

If you choose to participate, write a post with your response to the question. Once you are done, tag your post with #FPQ and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

The issue with pingbacks not showing up seems to have been resolved, but you might check to confirm that your pingback is there. If not, please manually add your link in the comments.

Fandango’s Provocative Question #41

FPQWelcome once again to Fandango’s Provocative Question. Each week I will pose what I think is a provocative question for your consideration. By provocative, I don’t mean a question that will cause annoyance or anger. Nor do I mean a question intended to arouse sexual desire or interest.

What I do mean is a question that is likely to get you to think, to be creative, and to provoke a response. Hopefully a positive response.

This week I came upon a quote from Zadie Smith, an English novelist, essayist, and short-story writer.48F9BB42-DD80-4A1C-BEED-1D12CC1DB85EI was originally going to use her quote for my response to Linda G. Hill’s One-Liner Wednesday prompt today, but the more I thought about the quote, I decided that it would be better suited for this week’s provocative question. Here’s her quote:

“The past is always tense, the future perfect.”

I love this quote. It’s a play on words with respect to verb tenses (past tense and future perfect tense). But it’s also more than that, isn’t it?

Our pasts are filled with many moments and memories, both good ones and bad ones. Yet when many of us think about our pasts, we often tend to focus on the negative moments, those times and events that we may regret or where we wish we’d done or said something different.

But our pasts are what made us who we are today and because of what we have learned — hopefully — from our pasts, we have a chance to make our futures better and brighter. And maybe even perfect.

So this week’s question is for you to discuss what you think about Zadie Smith’s quote. Do you believe that the past is always tense, the future perfect?

If you choose to participate, write a post with your response to the question. Once you are done, tag your post with #FPQ and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

The issue with pingbacks not showing up seems to have been resolved, but you might check to confirm that your pingback is there. If not, please manually add your link in the comments.

#writephoto — Appreciate the Calm Serenity

510733DB-B841-4BED-837E-82805DD71436Lenny sat down on the sand, took a deep breath, and let out a long, heavy sigh.

“Are you okay?” his wife asked, sitting down next to him.

“No, I’m far from okay,” he said. “The whole world is topsy-turvy, empathy and civility have disappeared, political and societal norms are fractured, our democratic institutions are crumbling, and everything we know and have trusted is being sabotaged by those in power right in front of our eyes.”

“I know, honey,” Lorraine said. “That’s why we’re here. To escape that nonsense, even for just a few days. You need to stop thinking about it, clear your mind, recharge your batteries, and appreciate the calm serenity of this place.”

“Unless we stay here forever, there’s no escape from what is happening to our country.” Lenny lamented.

“Lenny, when we were young, we were activists,” Lorraine said. “We protested the Vietnam war. We marched with Dr. King, we fought for environmental protections, we worked to support progressive candidates.”

“I know,” Lenny said. “We’re old now. We’re in our seventies. We need to hand over the torch to the younger generation. It’s their future, not ours, that is on the line.”

“Exactly,” said Lorraine. “We need to make the most of our golden years and pass the baton to our kids. It’s their problem now. They have a vested interest in turning things around and making our country and the world a better, friendlier, and more livable place.”

“Right,” Lenny said. “And our kids will look back at us and wonder how we screwed things up so badly. Our legacy will be that we destroyed their future almost beyond repair.”

Now it was Lorraine’s turn take a deep breath to and let out a long, heavy sigh. “You always have a way of ruining even the most serene moment, don’t you? Thanks a lot, you crotchety old fart. Now I’m in a bad mood.”


Written for this week’s Thursday Photo Prompt from Sue Vincent.