Common Sense or a Lack Thereof

In a post from earlier this week, Di, over at Pensitivity101, wrote, “Common sense seems to have gone out of the window.” That, my friends, is an understatement.

Take, for example the case of a woman who was angry that the dining area at a McDonald’s was closed due to the restrictions in place to curb the spread of the coronavirus. So what did she do to express her anger? She took out her gun and opened fire, wounding three McDonald’s employees. I mean talk about a lack of common sense. What was this woman thinking when she decided to eat at a McDonald’s? That food will kill you!

But seriously folks, what the hell is going on inside people’s heads?Virus Outbreak OhioHeavily armed protesters are crowded together, few wearing masks, at state houses all across the country wanting to open things up again, and carrying around stupid signs like these.DAD41AED-F69A-424C-8EDE-0D0863158C6DDo they want to get sick and possibly die in the name of “freedom” and “liberty” in order to mingle, go to tattoo parlors, and dine-in at restaurants?

I’m not a person of faith, at least not in the religious or spiritual sense. But I’ve always had faith in my country. I’ve always felt that, for the most part, America was a good country to live in and that most Americans, outside of the extremes on both the far right and far left, displayed at least a modicum of common sense and a shared sense of common interests. That’s not to say that I thought of the United States as perfect or its citizens as exemplary. To believe that would be naive and stupid.

But recent history has proved me wrong about the nature of my country and its people. My faith in America is now gone and I’m feeling a profound sense of loss. There seems to be an  inherent madness in Americans. A madness based on our willingness to believe in whatever fiction best comforts us — or enrages us. In the face of overwhelming uncertainty, we desperately seek some ground to stand on, even if that ground does not actually exist.

But I guess we Americans got what we deserved. We elected a reality show TV host as president, one who likes to pretend to be the country’s leader but has no idea how to actually lead a country.

So you’re right, Di, common sense seems to, indeed, have gone out of the window.

Fandango’s Provocative Question #32

FPQWelcome once again to Fandango’s Provocative Question. Each week I will pose what I think is a provocative question for your consideration. By provocative, I don’t mean a question that will cause annoyance or anger. Nor do I mean a question intended to arouse sexual desire or interest.

What I do mean is a question that is likely to get you to think, to be creative, and to provoke a response. Hopefully a positive response.

For this week’s provocative question, I am going to do something I haven’t before done in my provocative question prompt. I’m going to post something a fellow blogger wrote. In this case, the blogger is Judy Dykstra-Brown, and in one of her recent posts she wrote,

“I do believe that more evil has been done in this world by those absolutely sure of the rightness of their faith and their beliefs.”

So my question is this: do you agree with what Judy wrote? Why or why not?

If you want to read Judy’s full post in which this quote appeared in order to gain context, click here.

If you choose to participate, write a post with your response to the question. Once you are done, tag your post with #FPQ and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

The issue with pingbacks not showing up seems to have been resolved, but you might check to confirm that your pingback is there. If not, please manually add your link in the comments.

DWC — Christian Nation

21F63F5B-A29E-4469-AD69-3814332E5215“So what do you wish to declare as your religion?” the customs officer said.” Here in this country, as you know, we offer freedom of religion to all citizens.”

“And what about freedom from religion?” I asked.

“What do you mean by freedom from religion?” he asked.

“I mean that I have no religion to declare,” I responded.

“Are you saying that you have no faith?” he asked, giving me a bewildered look.

“Oh no, that’s not at all what I’m saying,” I said. “I have faith, but not in religion and not in God.”

“So who do you pray to, then?”

“I don’t pray.”

“That’s blasphemous, sir,” the visibly angry officer said.

“Listen, I know I’ve been out of the country for more than a decade and that a lot has changed since then, but our forefathers fought and died so that we could exercise our right to freedom of religion, including the right not to practice any religion at all, without interference from the government,” I said. “Are you telling me that their fight for that freedom was in vain, that it means nothing anymore?”

“I’m telling you,” he said, “that after the revolution of 2023, when the Constitution II was ratified two years later, our country was declared to be a Christian Nation, and while some minor non-Christian religions are still tolerated, agnosticism and atheism are against the law and against the natural order.

I looked at him and said, “So I cannot return to my country unless I declare my religion to be Christian?”

“Yes,” he said. “The official state religion is Christianity and you are free to declare yourself to be a member any of the approved Christian sects. That is the blessing bestowed upon us by the Supreme Leader of Trumplandia, Queen Ivanka.”


Written for yesterday’s Daily Writing Challenge from Teresa, The Haunted Wordsmith. The three words to use are faith, fight, and freedom. And yes, I know I’m a day late, but I had things to do, places to go, and people to see yesterday.

Life’s Purpose

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A blogger I follow named Jayne, who posts at A Life Retired, left an interesting comment on my post titled Faith Versus Reason. She wrote, “After reading [that post] and the comments, I am left with a couple questions for all. In absence of faith, what happens after life? What was the purpose for living?”

Let me first say that I’m not in any way an authority on what happens after life or on life’s meaning or purpose. So what I’m expressing herein is nothing more than my personal opinion.

That said, one of the most common arguments I hear about disbelief in God is the idea that without God, life would seem to be utterly devoid of any real meaning or purpose.

From my perspective, a belief in God, in and of itself, is not what gives our lives purpose. We can find purpose within our own lives by achieving good relationships with our families and with other people, with our work, with the groups to which we belong, and with the deeds we do.

As to what happens when our lives end, I believe it’s the same as it was before our lives began. We didn’t exist. I believe that this life we live in this world, in the here and now, is all there is. And when it comes to an end, it’s over and out.

But rather than suggesting that our lives, therefore, have no meaning or serve no purpose, I see it differently. I believe that recognition of this inescapable fate makes our lives and the time that we do have in this world even more meaningful.

But that’s just my opinion. I could be wrong.

Faith Versus Reason

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My blogging buddy, Jim, wrote a fascinating post today entitled “Why is it So Hard to Believe in God.” In addition to being a provocative post, he managed to get in the WordPress one-word prompt, “recreate,” when he wrote, “We cannot recreate the Big Bang, so we may never understand all of this, but we can believe that we do exist.” Well done, Jim.

In response to one of the comments on his post, Jim wrote, “I believe in logic and God makes sense to me….” I found that notion to be particularly interesting. I believe in logic, reason, and rationality, and it’s because of embracing those things that God makes no sense to me.

For purposes of this post, I’m going to consider “logic” and “reason” to be synonymous, although technically they aren’t. Reason is the capacity for consciously making sense of things, applying logic, establishing and verifying facts, and changing or justifying practices, institutions, and beliefs based on new or existing information.

That said, logic (or reason) is the antithesis of faith. It takes tremendous faith to believe that an omnipotent, omnipresent, omniscient, supernatural being created everything that exists.

So the question I have for Jim, or for anyone who cares to weigh in is this. When it comes to belief in God, can logic and reason support that belief, or must one suspend logical and rational thought  in favor of pure faith to believe in the existence of God as the creator of all things?

Please feel free to share your thoughts (or beliefs).