If You See Something, Say Something

I like to think that my published posts are error free. No typos. No misspellings. No incorrect word usage. No punctuation faux pas. No grammatical errors. But I am my own proofreader, my own editor. And thus, my eyes often see what my brain is expecting them to see. And my brain is not expecting to see typos, misspellings, incorrect usage, punctuation and/or grammatical errors.

So I’m asking you, my fellow bloggers, to give me a helping hand. When you read my posts, if you see something, say something. Let me know in the comments if you spot an error, a mistake. I’m a big boy. I can take it. And I’d rather know of my error and fix it ASAP than let it be discovered by countless bloggers forever and for eternity.

I promise I won’t shoot the messenger.

Thank you

Truthful Tuesday — The Butterfly Effect

Frank, aka PCGuy, has published another one of his Truthful Tuesday posts, and this week Frank wants to know…

Would you jump at the chance to go back and correct some of the errors you made in your youth, even if it meant fundamentally changing who you are now?

As Queen sang in their song “We Are the Champions,” …and bad mistakes, I’ve made a few. And some of those mistakes were, indeed, doozies. So sure, in some fantasy world, it might be nice to call a Mulligan and get a do-over.

But overall, I feel that lived a pretty good life and I’d be concerned about the Butterfly Effect of going back and “fixing” those mistakes. The Butterfly Effect, as you know, is the phenomenon where a small change in starting conditions can lead to vastly different outcomes.

So, a small change to something that happened in my past might mean that the life that I’ve lived, and that I’m happy with, might be vastly different than what it is.

And as the old saying goes, Don’t mess with success.

Fandango’s Provocative Question #51

FPQWelcome once again to Fandango’s Provocative Question. Each week I will pose what I think is a provocative question for your consideration.

By provocative, I don’t mean a question that will cause annoyance or anger. Nor do I mean a question intended to arouse sexual desire or interest.

What I do mean is a question that is likely to get you to think, to be creative, and to provoke a response. Hopefully a positive response.

My provocative question today is about blogging etiquette.

I am probably guilty of what language maven Ben Zimmer refers to as “peeveblogging.” According to Zimmer, peeveblogging occurs when a blogger (e.g., me) uses his or her blog to vent about language, usage, punctuation, and grammatical faux pas. So yes, I admit to being a peeveblogger. A proud peeveblogger, at that.

Erin McKean, who used to contribute to a weekly language column, “The Word,” for the Sunday Boston Globe, wrote a column about a decade ago entitled “Correctiquette.” Ms. McKean took a shot at people like me. In that column she wrote, “If the person’s meaning is perfectly clear, realize that what you’re really criticizing is their style — and style, or taste, is pointless to argue over.”

When it comes to pointing out grammatical or usage mistakes of others, McKean wrote, “Be honest with yourself: do you really care about helping the other person, or do you just want the thrill of being right?”

So this leads me to today’s provocative question.

If people find typos or grammatical, punctuation, spelling, or usage errors in your posts, do you welcome having them pointed out to you, or do you resent it. As a blogger do you let people know about such mistakes or do you just let them go?

If you choose to participate, write a post with your response to the question. Once you are done, tag your post with #FPQ and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

The issue with pingbacks not showing up seems to have been resolved, but you might check to confirm that your pingback is there. If not, please manually add your link in the comments.