Fandango’s Provocative Question #104

FPQWelcome once again to Fandango’s Provocative Question. Each week I will pose what I think is a provocative question for your consideration.

By provocative, I don’t mean a question that will cause annoyance or anger. Nor do I mean a question intended to arouse sexual desire or interest.

What I do mean is a question that is likely to get you to think, to be creative, and to provoke a response. Hopefully a positive response.

Today’s provocative question is about formal education. We all have our opinions on how best to educate and prepare our children to succeed in today’s highly complex world. So this begs the question:

What do you think is the one subject (or thing) that should be taught in school that isn’t?

If you choose to participate, write a post with your response to the question. Once you are done, tag your post with #FPQ and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments. But remember to check to confirm that your pingback or your link shows up in the comments.

Wall Street Versus Main Street

D0D31E18-F47E-481E-B833-F1633E716B72As I write this, the Dow Jones Industrial Average, the premier barometer of Wall Street and the “health” of the American economy, is on a tear. And this makes Donald Trump and the relatively small numbers of American population who are wealthy and are heavily invested in the stock market very, very happy. But what about average, everyday Americans?

According to a Gallup poll conducted in March and April, 55% of Americans reported that they own stock. A high percentage of that stock ownership is from people like me, whose money is invested in retirement savings accounts, like their employer-based 401(k) or IRA accounts. But according to Goldman Sachs, the richest one percent of Americans account for more than half the value of equities owned by U.S. households.

Stock ownership is strongly correlated with household income, formal education, age, and race. It’s much higher among older, more highly educated whites earning more than $100,000 annually than it is among blacks, Hispanics, and the non-college educated.

So yes, a segment of the population is thrilled with the way that Wall Street has bounced back. But what about Main Street America? Are Wall Street and Main Street out of touch?

Wall Street investors are are excited and optimistic simply because they see progress in the reopening of our economy. Yet the continuing health crisis from COVID-19 has killed almost 110,000 Americans and there is no let-up in sight. There is record-high unemployment. Civil rights demonstrations (some violent) have been occurring across the nation. And the president is threatening to use the military against American citizens using their First Amendment right to assemble and demonstrate.

So there does seem to be yet another divide in America. Not the race divide, not the income divide. Not the political divide. But the divide that has a little bit of all of that: the divide between Wall Street and Main Street.

FOWC with Fandango — Education

FOWCWelcome to May 4, 2020 and to Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (aka, FOWC). It’s designed to fill the void after WordPress bailed on its daily one-word prompt.

I will be posting each day’s word just after midnight Pacific Time (US).

Today’s word is “education.”

Write a post using that word. It can be prose, poetry, fiction, non-fiction. It can be any length. It can be just a picture or a drawing if you want. No holds barred, so to speak.

Once you are done, tag your post with #FOWC and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

The issue with pingbacks not showing up seems to have been resolved, but you might check to confirm that your pingback is there. If not, please manually add your link in the comments.

And be sure to read the posts of other bloggers who respond to this prompt. You will marvel at their creativity.

Fandango’s Provocative Question #59

FPQWelcome once again to Fandango’s Provocative Question. Each week I will pose what I think is a provocative question for your consideration.

By provocative, I don’t mean a question that will cause annoyance or anger. Nor do I mean a question intended to arouse sexual desire or interest.

What I do mean is a question that is likely to get you to think, to be creative, and to provoke a response. Hopefully a positive response.

Politicians are talking a lot about education these days. Free college tuition, free pre-kindergarten, student loan forgiveness, charter schools, higher teachers’ salaries, etc.

So in this atmosphere where education is at the forefront, my provocative question this week is:

What does it mean to you in the 21st century to be well educated?

If you choose to participate, write a post with your response to the question. Once you are done, tag your post with #FPQ and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments. But remember to check to confirm that your pingback or your link shows up in the comments.

Oh the Horror!

7168C394-67BC-459C-ACF3-1C74B2D41050Virginia Kruta, an associate editor at the conservative news website The Daily Caller, witnessed an absolutely chilling display. She “crashed” a political rally in Missouri at which the democratic candidate for Congress from New York, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, was a speaker. And what Kruta heard terrified her.

So what did Kruta find so chilling? Well, as she said, “I saw how easy it would be, as a parent, to accept the idea that my children deserve healthcare and education. I saw how easy it would be, as someone who has struggled to make ends meet, to accept the idea that a ‘living wage’ was a human right. Above all, I saw how easy it would be to accept the notion that it was the government’s job to make sure that those things were provided.”

Oh the horror! Healthcare and education for children? A “living wage” for people who work? A government’s job to provide for its citizens? That’s heresy to Republicans. It’s antithetical to everything they stand for.

Fortunately, Kruta recovered from her harrowing experience, writing “I left the rally with a photo — in part to remind myself of that time I crashed a rally headlined by a socialist, but also in part to remind myself that there, but for the grace of God, go I.”

Remember in November, American voters, that Republicans truly believe that healthcare and education, a living wage, and a government that works for its citizens is an anathema.