Linear Thinking

0C8DBED3-C2C3-4BA2-8A82-D76E5702E8FD“I don’t recommend that you carry that large of a load this coming semester,” the guidance counselor said.

“Listen,” Aaron said, “I’ve given this whole curriculum a lot of thought. As they say, the shortest distance between two points is a straight line. My plan is to graduate in three years instead of four and to do that I need to take all of my classes in a very deliberate, sequential manner. I’m simply applying the concept of linear thinking to my decision.”

“But college is not only about going to classes and academic achievement,” the guidance counselor said. “Don’t you want to participate in any extracurricular activities? And what about a social life?”

“I have neither the time nor the interest in wasting my time with trash talk,” Aaron said. “It’s my conviction that my focus has to be on academics and my goal of graduating in three years.”

The guidance counselor sighed. “Well, Aaron,” she said, “I can tell that you process a great intelligence, but I fear that you’re demonstrating a serious lack of wisdom.”


Written for these one-word prompts: Ragtag Daily Prompt (recommend), Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (carry), Scotts Daily Prompt (linear), Weekly Prompts (trash talk), and Word of the Day (conviction). I also snuck in a not so provocative response for my Fandango’s Provocative Question Prompt (intelligence or wisdom).

Only in TODAY’S America

4743DF4B-7F2C-4F9E-9FF5-E1B38EDBE3D9I saw the following short blurb in this week’s issue of The Week magazine.

3D425AEF-8DDC-4DDC-B2FC-88BC5510EB1BYou are witnessing the brainwashing of America’s youth by conservatives who want to eliminate any references in schools and text books that conflict with their revisionist ideology.

Dollars and Degrees

Dollars and degrees

“Dollars and degrees. That’s all you care about, you self-centered bastard,” she said before turning away from him and taking a large sip from her martini glass.

He took a swig of his beer. They were sitting next to one another at the bar of the Tomfoolery, a popular pub in the Foggy Bottom section of D.C. “It’s Wednesday night, Deb. You know I have that urban planning paper due for tomorrow night’s class. I really need to head back to my place to finish it up.”

“You’ll use any excuse to get up and leave me here by myself,” Debbie slurred. “I swear, you don’t give two shits about me. All you care about are dollars and degrees.”

He liked Debbie. She was attractive, reasonably bright, and quite accomplished in the sack. But he was working on his master’s degree at night while holding down a full-time job during the day. He was barely half way through his 50 credit-hour curriculum; completing his master’s program by the end of the following year was his highest priority.

“I think you’re a little drunk, Deb,” he responded, finishing up his beer.

“And I think you’re a selfish prick” she snapped back.

He turned toward her and, affecting his most sincere, genuine manner, said, “I really do care about you, Debbie. I enjoy our time together. A lot, actually. But I have to finish this paper tonight. I’ll probably be up quite late and I have to be at work again by 8:30 in the morning. So even though I’d much rather stay here with you a little while longer and then head over to your place and spend the night, I’ve got to go.”

It was only a little white lie, he told himself.

She moved her bar stool closer to his, snuggled up next to him, and while running her hand up and down his inner thigh, whispered in a low, throaty voice, “I’d rather we head over to my place, too. We can both call in sick for work tomorrow.”

“I can’t,” he said, removing her hand from high up on his thigh. “I’m sorry, Deb, but I just can’t. Not tonight. I need to get this paper done.”

He stood up and retrieved his jacket and backpack from the hook beneath the bar. He leaned over toward Debbie and kissed her on her cheek. “I’ll call you tomorrow,” he said, and headed for the door.

As he was leaving the pub he heard her yell after him. “Dollars and degrees, you fucker! That’s all that’s important to you. Dollars and degrees.”