Fandango’s Friday Flashback — May 22

Wouldn’t you like to expose your newer readers to some of you earlier posts that they might never have seen? Or remind your long term followers of posts that they might not remember? Each Friday I will publish a post I wrote on this exact date in a previous year.

How about you? Why don’t you reach back into your own archives and highlight a post that you wrote on this very date in a previous year? You can repost your Friday Flashback post on your blog and pingback to this post. Or you can just write a comment below with a link to the post you selected.

If you’ve been blogging for less than a year, go ahead and choose a post that you previously published on this day (the 22nd) of any month within the past year and link to that post in a comment.


This was originally published on May 22, 2018. Do you remember the big brouhaha when San Francisco Giants’ quarterback Colin Kaepernick took a knee during the playing of the national anthem at an NFL game to protest inequitable treatment of backs by police? Oh, for the good old days when something like this what the biggest news of the day.

Changing the Rules

E6885681-5EB7-47E9-9BC4-964FD657D828NFL owners met in Atlanta to discuss how to handle the national anthem protests going forward. The owners are reportedly contemplating hitting teams with a 15-yard penalty if any of their players or coaches kneel during the playing of the anthem.

It is also considering allowing the home team to decide whether players and coaches come out for the national anthem or stay in the locker room. But if the team decides to have players and coaches come on the field for the opening ceremonies, and a coach or player decides to kneel, the team would be penalized 15 yards. This penalty would be assessed against the team in violation of this new rule on the first play of the game.

If the NFL owners ultimately decide to change the rules and to impose such a 15-yard penalty for players (and/or coaches) who kneel during the anthem, I will never go to or watch on TV another NFL game until such a rule, if enacted, is rescinded.