Stupid Is As Stupid Does

60CE4100-365A-4A3D-9724-0FD8AAFC0EE5You’ve probably seen this photo of these two buttholes at a recent Trump rally wearing t-shirts that read, “I’d rather be a Russian than Democrat.”

Is this really what Republicans believe? Does their hatred toward Democrats actually translate to their taking sides with the country, a declared adversary of American — and global — democracy, that meddled in the 2016 election to help Trump get elected and is likely continuing to meddle as we move toward the critical midterm elections in November?

What has happened to the Republican Party that once claimed to be the party that was tough on Russia and stood for family values? Has negative partisanship become so intense that they are willing to believe the worst about Democrats and to rationalize away the sins and crimes committed by Donald Trump and his cronies?

As Bill Maher said on his HBO show last night, the new Republican mantra seems to be “Better red than well read.”

And as Forrest Gump said, “Stupid is as stupid does.”

One-Liner Wednesday — Truthiness

“May you only hear from others what you’ve already been telling yourself.”

President Donald J. Trump

Okay, I lied. As much as that sounds like something Donald Trump would say, he didn’t say it. The quote came from Jordan Klepper, comedian and host of The Opposition with Jordan Klepper, a show on Comedy Central, which, sadly, was just canceled.39BC413A-F482-495E-B48B-8703064A11C8But doesn’t wanting to hear only what he already believes sound like Trump’s modus operandi? He labels anything he doesn’t like as “fake news” and calls those journalists who don’t write positive things about him “enemies of the American people.”

Unfortunately, only wanting to hear from others what you’ve already been telling yourself is not unique to Donald Trump and Jordan Klepper. And it doesn’t make much of a difference if you’re on the left or the right. We are such a divided nation right now that most of us tend to read, watch, or listen to whatever it is that reinforces our own partisan positions.

I refuse to watch Fox News. I only rarely watch CNN. I get most of my news from MSNBC. Why? Because they tell me what I am more receptive to hearing and more likely to accept.

About a dozen or so years ago, Stephen Colbert coined the word “truthiness.” Truthiness is the quality of seeming to be true based upon one’s intuition, opinion, or perception without regard to logic or factual evidence. It’s when someone feels, believes, or wishes that something is true even when it is not supported by the facts.

Truthiness is very similar to a concept espoused by comedian Bill Maher when he says, “I don’t know it for a fact…I just know it’s true.”

So fess up, people. How many of you really only want to hear from others what you’ve already been telling yourself?

Come on. It’s America’s birthday. Stand and be counted!


Written for today’s One-Liner Wednesday prompt from Linda G. Hill.

Share Your World — Sure, Why Not?

38B87E39-FDF7-4E88-8D95-8BD9B09B45C9I’ve enjoyed reading other bloggers’ responses to Cee Neuner’s Share Your World weekly prompt, but I’ve never actually participated. But this week’s SYW questions are irresistible. They are:

If aliens landed on earth tomorrow and offered to take you home with them, would you go? Sure. It’s been a long time since anyone has wanted to poke and probe my body, so why not?

How tall are you? Are you satisfied with your height? I used to be 6’1, but I’ve shrunk to around 5’10-1/2. I guess that’s what happens when you get older (sigh). Am I satisfied? Well, I’m still able to stand erect, so yeah. I’d rather be 5’10-1/2 vertically than 6’1 horizontally (i.e., six feet under).

Do you think you could live without your smartphone (or other technology item) for 24 hours? Not a chance. My iPhone is my lifeline. I use it for my blog (writing, reading, and commenting), to get my news, to get the sports scores, to buy things online, to read books I’ve downloaded, and to play solitaire when I get bored. I use my weather app, my Google Maps app, my iTunes app, my Notes app to create shopping lists, my calendar app, the timer, a bunch of photo apps. Omigod, I can’t inagine going for 24 solid hours without my iPhone…unless I was in a coma.

What did you appreciate or what made you smile this past week? That I haven’t yet been abducted by aliens, haven’t shrunk another half inch, and haven’t had to give up my iPhone for 24 hours.

Also when Bill Maher quipped about what the conservative right believes: “Life begins at conception and ends at the Rio Grande.” that made me smile and cringe at the same time.

You didn’t really think I’d write a whole post without saying something political, did you?

A Sad Excuse

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I don’t know about you, but I think Donald Trump is a sad excuse for a human being, much less as President of the United States and leader of the free world.

So when I recently heard a comedian, a former politician, a news commentator, and an editorial writer for a major metropolitan news paper say or write some quips about “The Donald” that resonated with me, I decided to post them right here on my little blog.

First there was comedian Bill Maher. He said on his HBO show the other night, “Once again, Donald Trump has taught us a valuable lesson: you can never be too rich to be white trash.”

Then I read that a former Mayor of San Francisco, Willie Brown, said he overheard a guy in a bar say, “Donald Trump handles politics the same way most people handle fireworks on the Fourth of July. Light the fuse and run like hell.”

On her weekend AM Joy show on MSNBC, Joy Reid said “Just when you think it can’t get any lower, Donald Trump redefines what rock bottom means.”

Finally, I read a comment in the editorial section of my local paper this morning. It read, “President Trump further demeans the office with a vile, misogynous tweet attacking MSNBC’s Mika Brzezinski. His dignity is hemorrhaging badly.”

As we get set to celebrate the birth of our nation here in the U.S., let’s hope that this won’t be our last true Independence Day as a free nation. The way things are going, next year at this time we may be a member nation of the Russian Federation.

And that’s no joke.

Facts Versus Truth

Facts and Truth

When I first read Faulkner’s quote (above), I was perplexed. I had always considered “facts” and “truth” to be synonyms. Even the definitions of the two words cross-reference one another:

Fact: something that actually exists; reality; truth.
Truth: conformity with fact or reality; a verified or indisputable fact.

Facts are used as proof of what is undeniably “the truth,” but are these words truly interchangeable or do they actually have different meanings and usage?

I was curious enough about the similarities and differences between these two words to do some Google research. And I learned that not everyone believes that they are synonymous. Some folks actually differentiate between the them using diametrically opposed logic.

One site argued that facts can be fleeting, enduring for but a moment. For example, the “fact” of someone’s location on a fast-moving train changes every instant. Truth, on the other hand is a more enduring type of fact, this source claimed.

Another site argued that if it’s a fact now, it will be a fact in the future, whereas truth is more temporal. Facts indicate a universal truth, while truth depends upon temporal circumstances. For example, that the sun appears to always rise in the east and set in the west is a fact. It will never change.

I found an interesting site, differencebetween.net, which provided four facts (or truths?) about facts and truths:

  • Facts are more objective when compared to the more subjective truths.
  • Facts are more permanent when compared to the more temporary truths.
  • Facts exist in reality, whereas truths are usually the things that one believes to be true, or the things that are true in the current situation.
  • Facts can also answer the ‘where,’ ‘when,’ and ‘how’ questions, whereas truths answer the ‘why’ question.

Truthiness

And then there is “truthiness,” a word first coined by Stephen Colbert a dozen years ago. Like when Bill Maher says, “I don’t know it for a fact…I just know it’s true,” truthiness is the quality of seeming to be true based upon one’s intuition, opinion, or perception without regard to logic or factual evidence. It’s when someone feels, believes, or wishes that something is true even when it is not supported by the facts.

So with both facts and truth under siege by Donald Trump and his surrogates, and with “alternative facts” and “false truths” being promulgated, I  have to wonder if Faulkner’s statement was extremely prescient and sadly reflective of where we are in the second decade of the 21st century.

So what do you think? Are the words “fact” and “truth” synonyms? Do you use them interchangeably in your oral and written communications? Or do these two words, as Faulkner believes, have little to do with each another?

And in today’s world, where truthiness means more to a lot of people than either facts or truth, does it even matter anymore?