Weekend Writing Prompt — The Nest Egg

I’m not timorous by nature, but with the performance of the stock market lately, my retirement nest egg is withering away, and I’ve developed a case of the collywobbles.

It’s impossible to take notice of the precipitous fall and not be concerned. But I told my wife, “I know it’s for the birds, honey, but don’t worry, when market bounces back, we’ll have money left to spare.”

(Exactly 68 words)


Written for Sammi Cox’s Weekend Writing Prompt, where the prompt is “collywobbles” in exactly 68 words. Also for these daily prompts: Your Daily Word Prompt (timorous), Fandango’s One-Wird Challenge (stock), E.M.’s Random Word Prompt (withering), My Vivid Blog (impossible), Ragtag Daily Prompt (birds), Word of the Day Challenge (honey), and The Daily Spur (spare).

In case you’re not familiar with the expression “for the birds,” it’s an American idiom describing something as useless, meaningless, unimportant, not to be taken seriously. It can sometimes also be the used as the equivalent of “this sucks.”

8 thoughts on “Weekend Writing Prompt — The Nest Egg

  1. donmatthewspoetry October 15, 2022 / 4:29 pm

    ‘For the birds’ is a bit tame for us. We say ‘As useful as tits on a bull’……

    But we do say ‘collywobbles’……

    Hey? did you know this? I didn’t……

    ‘Collywobbles’ is believed to be a friendlier-sounding transformation of cholera morbus (the New Latin term for the disease cholera) that was influenced by the words colic and wobble

    Liked by 1 person

    • Fandango October 15, 2022 / 5:18 pm

      I had to Google “collywobbles” because that’s not a common word around these parts. Mostly is means stomach pain or queasiness, but I did read about how it evolved from cholera on one site.

      Like

  2. cagedunn October 15, 2022 / 5:05 pm

    When the ether of stockmarket is falling, the rise comes in tangible objects.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Nope, Not Pam October 16, 2022 / 3:11 am

    It’s a bit like that, isn’t it 😳

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Bill October 18, 2022 / 9:22 am

    Great use of the prompt. I’d never thought to explain idioms, slang, and such. Good idea. Cleverly done. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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