Fandango’s Story Starter #64

It’s time for my weekly Story Starter prompt. Here’s how it works. Every Tuesday morning (my time), I’m going to give you a “teaser” sentence and your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to build a story (prose or poetry) around that sentence. It doesn’t have to be the first sentence in your story, and you don’t even have to use it in your post at all if you don’t want to. The purpose of the teaser is simply to spark your imagination and to get your storytelling juices flowing.

This week’s Story Starter teaser is:

He hadn’t realized that he had past the point of no return until…

If you care to write and post a story built from this teaser, be sure to link back to this post and to tag your post with #FSS. I would also encourage you to read and enjoy what your fellow bloggers do with their stories.

And most of all, have fun.

20 thoughts on “Fandango’s Story Starter #64

  1. bushboy September 20, 2022 / 4:05 am

    He hadn’t realized that he had past the point of no return until…it was pointed out to him 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Marleen September 20, 2022 / 5:46 am

    I think you want the other spelling: He .. passed (rather than past) the point …

    Liked by 1 person

      • Fandango September 20, 2022 / 11:32 am

        I am correct: past the point of no return is proper English. See my reply to Marleen’s comment.

        Like

    • Fandango September 20, 2022 / 10:58 am

      Per the free online dictionary:

      To be past the point of no return:
      To have passed the last opportunity to reverse one’s actions or return to one’s starting position.
      “Once we sign this agreement, we’ll be past the point of no return. We’re committed for the long haul after that.”

      “Our only option is to keep climbing the mountain, because it’s far too dangerous to turn back. We’re past the point of no return, now.”

      Like

      • Marleen September 20, 2022 / 4:05 pm

        Yeah, I was (seeing that you didn’t make a change) just now going to say an alternative would be that … he was past the point … — but not had [unless it’s passed].…

        Liked by 1 person

      • Marleen September 20, 2022 / 4:20 pm

        You will see a third option here:

        https://www.quora.com/Which-is-correct-passed-the-point-or-past-the-point?share=1

        … “passed the point” or “past the point” —-

        They are both serviceable phrases. Which one you use depends on what you’re trying to say, because they mean different things.

        “Passed” is the past tense of the verb, “to pass,” which means “to overtake or to go by.” He had passed the point of no return.

        “Past” is a preposition, meaning “beyond.” (Of course, it’s also a noun and an adjective, referring to time before the present.) He had gone past the point of no return.

        Don’t get them mixed up. Prepositions generally tell you where one thing is, relative to something else: words like over, under, around and through, as well as past, are prepositions.

        Verbs indicate action: run, go, swim, and pass are verbs. “Passed” is something I did before now, in the past.

        So, no one ever past the point of no return; they only passed it. No one ever went passed the point of no return; they only went past it.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Marleen September 20, 2022 / 11:23 pm

        Pat wasn’t fully recognizing that this was his last opportunity to embark; he chose to take in the counsel of his favorite mentor first. But he was on the verge—about to have passed the point of no return. His hopes of a life immersed in music, and not heavily or fully funded by other work, was going to be the ship he would forever wish to come in while it would be a ghost of only past potential.

        This has been brought to you as an alternative history. It’s based on a story that can be heard from four minutes in (or can be begun at two in) and doesn’t require listening to the whole video.

        The Metheny Interview (last year) • Beato

        Liked by 1 person

      • Marleen September 20, 2022 / 11:45 pm

        To be past the point of no return:
        To have passed the last opportunity [or point] …

        _______________________________________________________

        To Be, Eight Words Showing Its Various Forms

        You need eight words when conjugating the verb to be:

        Form To Be
        Infinitive 1. be
        Present Tense 2. am 3. is 4. are
        Past Tense 5. was 6. were
        Past Participle 7. been
        Present Participle 8. being

        …..

        Present Tense, To Be

        ~

        Past Tense, To Be

        ~

        Future Tense, To Be

        ~

        Present-Perfect Tense, To Be

        ~

        Past-Perfect Tense, To Be

        ~

        Future-Perfect Tense, To Be

        ~

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Paula Light September 20, 2022 / 1:00 pm

    I may have to do this tomorrow! There’s a zillion prompts today and I want to think of something good!

    Liked by 1 person

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