Fandango’s Flashback Friday — August 19th

Wouldn’t you like to expose your newer readers to some of your earlier posts that they might never have seen? Or remind your long term followers of posts that they might not remember? Each Friday I will publish a post I wrote on this exact date in a previous year.

How about you? Why don’t you reach back into your own archives and highlight a post that you wrote on this very date in a previous year? You can repost your Friday Flashback post on your blog and pingback to this post. Or you can just write a comment below with a link to the post you selected.

If you’ve been blogging for less than a year, go ahead and choose a post that you previously published on this day (the 19th) of any month within the past year and link to that post in a comment.


This was originally posted on August 19, 2017.

SoCS — Pant-Pant-Blow

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The first time my wife got pregnant we were advised by her OB/GYN to enroll in a Lamaze class. These classes teach young couples how to prepare for childbirth and, more importantly, how to make it through labor and delivery.

One of the key learnings from the Lamaze class was how to breathe. Naturally, this lesson was intended for the soon-to-be mother to learn breathing techniques during labor. But the husband had a role as well. He was to be her coach, and as such, he, too, needed to learn the proper breathing techniques in order to help his wife manage the trauma of labor and delivery.

One such breathing technique is referred to as “pant-pant-blow.”

Our Lamaze instructor told my wife that as her contractions became more intense, she should exhale in a pant-pant-blow pattern. She needed to take a deep breath in through your nose when her contraction started and then exhale in two short pants followed by one longer blow. That breathing in and panting out should take about 10 seconds and should be repeated until the contraction stops.

Well, one night my wife’s water broke and we headed to the hospital. She got settled in her room in the maternity ward, where, in my role as her coach, I was by her side.

I was armed with a large cup of shaved ice in case her mouth got dry. I had a small, brown paper bag for her to breathe into should she start to hyperventilate or feel dizzy while doing the breathing exercises we’d learned.

Things were moving along, albeit slowly. She was only about five centimeters dilated after about six hours and her contractions to that point had been fairly mild. So her doctor decided to give her Pitocin to speed things up.

It worked. Within an hour her contractions started coming fast and furious and that’s when she really needed my help. I was there for her, holding her hand, mopping her brow, and pant-pant-blowing right along with her.

Between contractions, I was dropping pinches of shaved ice into her mouth like a mother bird feeding her chicks.

And then the wheels came off the bus. My poor wife was in the middle of an intense contraction and we were pant-pant-blowing together. The next thing I remember was waking up in the other bed in my wife’s hospital room. I had a major headache and a bandage on my forehead.

I must have been a little too exuberant in my pant-pant-blow technique. I somehow managed to black out and, on my way to the floor, I knocked my head on the metal railing of her hospital bed.

Fortunately I was revived just before they wheeled my wife to the delivery room. Still, I was mortified by my failure as her labor coach.

To this day, though, I tell my daughter, who was born that night, that being there for her birth really knocked me out!


Written for this week’s Stream of Consciousness Saturday prompt from Linda G. Hill. The challenge was to write a post around the word “pant,” just in case you couldn’t tell.

37 thoughts on “Fandango’s Flashback Friday — August 19th

  1. Sadje August 19, 2022 / 3:33 am

    At least you tried your best! Full marks for daddy.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. donmatthewspoetry August 19, 2022 / 3:36 am

    Good heavens…well done for trying….

    I would be hopeless – breathing instructions too complex…….

    They give you laughing gas here for pain relief – Makes you euphoric and giggly……hmm

    Liked by 1 person

    • Fandango August 19, 2022 / 9:09 am

      Sounds a lot like my cannabis-infused marshmallows.

      Like

      • Marleen August 19, 2022 / 2:06 pm

        Do they, really? I’d rather have that than the spinal injection and other dumb stuff they do here.

        Liked by 1 person

          • Marleen August 20, 2022 / 12:01 am

            Oh, I had heard of tranquilizers being given to women. And that wasn’t so great, for one reason, because it was just to make the woman more out of it (and easy for the doctor to handle) but not to reduce pain. As for what the gas does, gas which they are saying is not a drug (which makes no sense), I can see how it would help a lot of women. And if it really helps people avoid epidurals, that’s excellent. However, I wouldn’t have needed it as I was already relaxed. They aren’t claiming it reduces pain. But relaxing is important (and could help someone focus instead of making their own pain worse by panicking).

            At the link below (for anyone who clicks), which obviously isn’t very interesting for somone who already knows about this, skip the box that looks like a news video — all that plays is an advertisement against drug abuse.

            This is from 2019.

            https://www.cbsnews.com/chicago/news/women-laughing-gas-alternative-childbirth/

            “I’m pretty sensitive to drugs and I just wanted the unmedicated experience,” she said.

            Her registered nurse, midwife Ronni Rothman, was happy to be able to offer a new option at Einstein Medical Center in Pennsylvania.

            Nitrous oxide –laughing gas — is now available to help women in labor.

            “She will self-administer, so she puts the mask over her face,” Rothman said. “During contractions, she’ll breath in and out during contraction, keeping it over her face.”

            ~

            “It relaxes you as best as you can during that pain,” she said. “It helps you focus on the breathing.”

            Doctors say nitrous oxide is less invasive than an epidural that numbs the lower body. And unlike narcotics, the gas doesn’t affect the baby and is quickly out of the mom’s system.

            Liked by 1 person

    • Marleen August 19, 2022 / 2:07 pm

      Oops. I was meaning to ask Don about the laughing gas.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Nancy Richy August 19, 2022 / 3:48 am

    Oh you poor thing, Fan! Well, if it’s any consolation it happens more often than you think. Labor is hard, even for the dad!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Nope, Not Pam August 19, 2022 / 4:16 am

    Hysterical. My hubby fainted 😂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Marilyn Armstrong August 19, 2022 / 11:10 am

    In Israel, they were always willing to let mothers in to see their kids being treated but were very dubious about men. They eventually explained to me that they guy might be a general in the army, but watching a child being stitched up following a fall frequently make them faint and they just didn’t have enough personal to deal with the child and the passed out dad. I always found that amusing. It’s just so different when it’s family.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Marleen August 19, 2022 / 2:18 pm

    The mother of a girl I met in seventh grade was a Lamaze instructor. It was, apparently, a known thing that the particular breathing they teach easily knocks people out. It was a sort of game (amongst a few girls) at recess, for a while, to breathe a certain way while counting to three and pass out.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Leyde Ryan August 19, 2022 / 4:19 pm

    Oh gosh, I know I shouldn’t laugh…but couldn’t help it!! Great story, especially for your daughter, I would imagine. You described a few reasons why I chose to never get pregnant 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  8. leigha66 August 25, 2022 / 2:34 pm

    Made for a VERY memorable moment for both you and your wife I am sure.

    Liked by 1 person

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