Share Your World — 6/28/21

For today’s Share Your World edition, Melanie is tossing us a mixed bag of questions.

What do you think of the idea of the ‘greater good’ principle?

That totally depends up whose definition of the “greater good” you’re embracing. The “greater good” is supposed to be something that benefits the public more than any one individual. But who is to say what the “greater good” actually is and who benefits the most from it. Bottom line, the idea of the “greater good” sounds noble, but practically speaking, the “greater good” is subjective and is often defined by those in positions of power to support their own unenlightened self-interests. And, as the old saying goes, one man’s meat is another man’s poison. That’s somehow relevant, isn’t it?

Do you enjoy riding a roller coaster or other amusement park type ride?

I used to love going on roller coasters back in the day. Not so much anymore. As to amusement parks in general, I haven’t been to one in well over a decade.

Which musical instrument is the most annoying to you personally?

No offense to my Australian friends, but I’m going with the didgeridoo.

Would you rather have a vivid imagination or a photographic memory if you had to choose just one?

I’d go for a vivid imagination, especially given that at my age, my memory is starting to fail me. What was the question again?

Feel free to share fun plans for this season that you might have. Especially now that many places are lifting restrictions and travel is a bit easier.

Yes, things are opening up, and I’m grateful for that. But my wife and I don’t have any travel plans for the foreseeable future. The U.S. hasn’t yet reached the herd immunity level and new COVID-19 cases in many areas are on the rise. And then there’s the highly infectious Delta variant, which is spreading quickly and seems like it could be deadlier than the original COVID strain. So we are staying close to home.

23 thoughts on “Share Your World — 6/28/21

    • Melanie B Cee June 29, 2021 / 7:48 am

      That was great! You always find some stirring music Jim! I have to wonder about the Aboriginal guy up there in native dress though. Now that took some sand!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Fandango June 28, 2021 / 2:49 pm

      Thank you, Carol Anne.

      Like

  1. JT Twissel June 28, 2021 / 3:29 pm

    Another good reason to stay home is that people are acting pretty crazy out there. Especially on planes!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Fandango June 28, 2021 / 3:34 pm

      That’s true, too.

      Like

  2. Jewish Young Professional "JYP" June 28, 2021 / 4:47 pm

    I like your answer to the first question. I feel like “greater good” is one of those phrases that sounds positive until you think about it. Whose greater good? And at what cost (and who pays the cost)? Who gets to decide the greater good?

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Sadje June 28, 2021 / 5:14 pm

    I think you’re days off visiting amusement parks are coming back as you grandkids are growing up.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Marleen June 28, 2021 / 8:17 pm

    I cannot deal with the newer roller coasters that are designed to give people whiplash. I did, about a decade ago… but absolutely refuse, now. I probably still would enjoy the “Screamin’ Eagle” — outside of Saint Louis. I like Ferris wheels. I like water rides.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Melanie B Cee June 29, 2021 / 7:54 am

    Thank you for Sharing Your World Fandango! Interesting and thoughtful answers as always! The greater good question is one that could ‘spark’ a LOT of discussion, but so far most folks agree with what you wrote in essence. If ‘the greater good’ was utilized as it was meant to be, then it would be a good thing. But who would decide? And wouldn’t the very act of deciding be self-serving? You could go down a virtual rabbit hole with that one. I agree with the amusement park answer, I’m not your age but I’m too old to go fooling around on that stuff. Something would get jarred out of alignment and probably permanently too. Not worth it, not to mention the crowds and your wise words on Covid. It IS startling how it’s presumed that we’ve beaten the thing. Nah. It’s just sleeping. And it’ll be baaack. Those last words are never for anything good. 😦 I think you and your wife are prudent to do small things in your own comfort zone for now. Maybe that’s just how it’s going to be in general for everyone going forward. Have a great week and stay off those roller coasters! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Fandango June 29, 2021 / 10:32 am

      “Maybe that’s just how it’s going to be in general for everyone going forward.” Yes, the “new normal.”

      Like

  6. Marleen June 29, 2021 / 2:37 pm

    I was naive as a youngster. I think a lot of people still are to some extent, more than they know, into and throughout adulthood. The idea is that upstanding members of society do the right things and behave appropriately (with the caveat {or excuse} that no one is perfect). I was more obedient than most kids, and internally monitored on top of that. I could see that some people in the polite world were a little “off” — but there were pre-emptive answers for that: you do what you are supposed to do even if/when someone else doesn’t. What if that someone else is your mother? And she has divorced your dad so that she is the one you have around most of the time?

    [A weird thing about her already before that bizarre move was her wearing of extremely short dresses even while attending church (this was something I could overlook and did but, looking back, was atrocious). Meanwhile, she had overly-restrictive rules for me beyond church rules.* But there’s that one primo rule: obey your parents.

    Jesus put a dent in that, to say the least, but I couldn’t quite see it then; it’s not helpful to make it plain in churches, either. And, even now, I hesitate at the thought in general. I believed it enough while I was bringing up my children that I had very few hard and fast rules. I had more positive developmentally-focused interaction as a mother.]

    I tried to address the generic concept of “knowing” what is obvious to do, because “God” said so, with a very religious person who is no doubt like her “conservative” compatriots in liking the idea of Ten Commandment postings (as contrasted with historical portrayals of Moses on the mountain) being in your face at state locations. Her go-to “out” was to say things about children reaching an age of reason (that development can vary); if one has reached that existential reality, then one wouldn’t have to listen to one’s mother, apparently (because you can perceive for yourself). In other words, it isn’t always obvious what one should do (while she would-not admit it). And I will add… if a child is only obligated to submit to parents before his or her age of reason, how is the child to “reason” it out that submitting is proper? And how are most adults naive?

    They think the people with greatest power, and the richest people, must be better people. I think it’s an extension of having been indoctrinated to believe those big adults in their infancy and through adolescence were somehow sacrosanct; this immature view is cultivated in certain segments of the population but not entirely overcome in most of those who are more wise. I have done a thing or two that don’t fit the rules (while said rules can be contradictory themselves and most people don’t actually learn them or how they are sorted out anyway); it was for the greater good. But here we are. Some people break rules for good, some (most) for bad or for selfish aims. And most think the rules are the rules; the greater good is the aim of the traditional rules we expect (whether or not we’ve searched them out in the books of all morality). We are continually surprised and outraged that winners can be evil.

    * A brief example is that when I was in second grade there was a day (at my religious school) that we didn’t have to wear our specified clothing (required all other days). We could wear whatever on a day at the end of the term in mid-June. All wore comfortable play clothes. I had to wear a brand new light yellow (and white) outfit. In my teens, my mother wouldn’t let me wear cutoff jean shorts at all. A neighbor lady finally convinced her it wasn’t okay to let me wear them (at home). I wonder how nuts (or hypocritical) the neighbors thought she was.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Marleen June 29, 2021 / 2:43 pm

      … convinced her it was okay to let me …

      (I don’t know why auto “correction” puts “n’t” at the ends of words like that as a matter of habit.)

      Liked by 1 person

  7. J-Dub June 29, 2021 / 7:03 pm

    That Delta variant has me worried. Close to home sounds like a good idea.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. leigha66 July 10, 2021 / 8:46 pm

    A piccolo is incredibly high pitched. And up until last weekend I would always ride the Raging River ride at the area amusement park… now I wonder. There was a tragic accident and the raft overturned trapping and killing an 11 year old, a teenager is in a coma and two others had less serious injuries. Awful accident on a ride that had just been inspected as “safe.”

    Liked by 1 person

    • Marleen July 10, 2021 / 9:46 pm

      I used to know more about how these places are checked. I’ve forgotten the details, but the gist of it is that they hardly are at all. A major accident happened in my state not long ago (years though). The Republicans in the state legislature had, of course, convinced everyone that private control is always better that public or governmental oversight (so the laws had changed). People died. Kasarasara, whatever will be is their motto. I guess.

      Liked by 2 people

      • leigha66 July 11, 2021 / 11:01 am

        Sadly this was not the first accident on that ride, but I hope something is done about the inspections process because of it,

        Liked by 1 person

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