Semiannual Ritual

752459D1-3A72-4A8B-8DA0-94B6B65B23BE“Do you know what’s happening this week?” Sol asked his wife.

Donna looked over at her husband. “Saint Patrick’s Day?”

“Well, yes, tomorrow is Saint Patrick’s Day,” Sol said. “But that’s not what I’m talking about.”

“What are you talking about, then?”

“Wednesday is the Vernal Equinox,” Sol said. “You know what that means, right?”

“Yes, it’s one of the two times each year that we have sex,” Donna said. “Once at the Vernon Equinox and once at the Autumnal Equinox. Woo hoo!”

(Exactly 83 words)


img_4297Written for Sammi Cox’s Weekend Writing Prompt. The idea is to take a word Sammi has selected, in this case, “Equinox,” and to write a post using exactly the number of words she suggests, in this case, 83.

The Rooftop Garden

DA93E711-420C-4AFC-B329-034F713A25C3“Would you like to see the rus-in-urbe we just completed,” Arlene asked her friend Betsy.

“Your Russian ruble?” Betsy said.

“Ha!” Arlene said. “No, our rus-in-urbe.”

“I’m unfamiliar with that term,” Betsy admitted. “What is it?”

“To be honest,” Arlene said, “Not too many people are knowledgeable about that turn of phrase, so don’t feel bad. It refers to a city garden that is constructed in order to provide the illusion of a rural countryside.”

“And you and Richard made such a garden?” Betsy asked.

“Yes, up on our roof deck,” Arlene said. “I’ve been hoarding a variety of seeds and bulbs to use once Richard designed and built the garden. We planted the seeds, bulbs, and some bushes we bought last fall and now, just in time for spring, they are flowering. Come, I’ll show you.” Arlene grabbed Betsy’s hand and led her up the stairs to the roof deck.

“Oh my God, Arlene!” Betsy exclaimed when she saw the garden on Arlene’s rooftop deck. “This is stunningly beautiful. I had no idea.”

Arlene beamed proudly. “It is, isn’t it? And guess what? The local paper is doing an article highlighting urban gardens and a reporter and photographer are coming over later this afternoon to include our little rus-in-urbe in their article.”

“Well aren’t you the illustrious one?” Betsy said, giving her friend a big hug.


Written for Teresa’s Opposites Attract prompt, where the words are knowledgeable and unfamiliar. Also for these daily prompts: Ragtag Daily Prompt (rus-in-urbe), Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (order), Your Daily Word Prompt, (hoard), Swimmers (time), and Word of the Day Challenge (illustrious).

SoCS — A Hole in His Sole

F2FC3391-F53E-4A3D-BAF6-7EB1967F2939He was a very practical and pragmatic man who went to work each weekday morning. She was a very spiritual, religious woman who went to church service every weekday morning. On Sunday mornings, he would go play a round of golf. On Sunday mornings, she would go to Sunday church service.

This Sunday, when he had returned from his round of golf and she had returned from her church service, they were each dressing for that day’s traditional Sunday evening family dinner.

When he was almost finished dressing, he sighed and said aloud, “Oh God, I have a hole in my sole.”

Having heard what he said, she came up to him, sympathetically put her arm around his shoulder, and said, “My love, do not worry. Together we will get through this. Finish dressing, and meet me out front. I will take you to get your soul fixed.”

Grateful for his wife’s attentiveness, albeit a bit surprised by her sense of urgency, he walked out of the front door and stepped into the passenger seat of their car that she had at ready in their driveway.

When she pulled out of the driveway, she drove to the left. He was puzzled and turned to his wife and said, “I think you’re going the wrong way.”

“Oh no sweetheart,” she said. “This is definitely the right way.”

“No, I’m sure you’re going the wrong way,” he said. “The shoemaker’s shop is in the strip mall on the north side of town. You’re driving south.”

“The shormaker’s shop?” she said. “Oh no, I’m taking you to see Pastor James at my church.”

“Does he know how to fix soles?” he asked.

“Oh darling,” she said, “fixing souls is what he does.”

“Honey,” he said, “I think we may have a homophone problem.”

“Are you talking about that gay couple that moved into that house around the corner?” she asked. “My pastor said that those types can steal one’s soul. But that doesn’t make him a homophobe, does it?

He chuckled. “Not ‘homophobe,’ honey.” Homophone. Homophones are words that sound alike but are spelled differently and have different meanings.”

She slammed on the brakes, stopped the car, and turned toward her husband. “So are you telling me that you don’t have a hole in your spiritual soul, you have a hole in your shoe’s sole?”

“Yes, exactly,” he said.

“Oh thank God,” she said, “I’m so relieved.” She started the car, turned it around, and headed toward the strip mall on the north side of town where the shoemaker has his shop.


Written for the Stream of Consciousness Saturday prompt from Linda G. Hill. The challenge is to write a post using “soul” and/or “sole.”

FOWC with Fandango — Order

FOWCWelcome to March 16, 2019 and to Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (aka, FOWC). It’s designed to fill the void after WordPress bailed on its daily one-word prompt.

I will be posting each day’s word just after midnight Pacific Time (US).

Today’s word is “order.”

Write a post using that word. It can be prose, poetry, fiction, non-fiction. It can be any length. It can be just a picture or a drawing if you want. No holds barred, so to speak.

Once you are done, tag your post with #FOWC and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

And be sure to read the posts of other bloggers who respond to this prompt. You will marvel at their creativity.