100WW — Missing Grammie

49BB67F8-AB41-4220-B2FE-5539E89B4F7A“I miss her,” Anna said. “This garden room was Grammie’s favorite place to sit and read.”

“This brings back so many memories,” Barbara added. “I’d come to her with a problem and she’d tell me, in her soothing, euphonious voice, to let it percolate for a while and a solution would soon reveal itself to me. It was almost baffling to me how right she always was.”

“It was quite an achievement that she lived as long as she did after having had her defective heart valve replaced with a bovine valve,” Anna added.

“She will be missed,” Barbara said.

(100 words)


Written for Bikurgurl’s 100 Word Wednesday prompt. Photo credit: Arno Smit. Also for these daily prompt words: Ragtag Daily Prompt (euphonious), Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (percolate), Weekly Prompts (baffling), Your Daily Word Prompt (achievement), and Word of the Day Challenge (bovine).

One-Liner Wednesday — The Wrong Questions

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“If they can get you asking the wrong questions, they don’t have to worry about answers.”

American Novelist Thomas Pynchon

This quote came from Thomas Pynchon’s 1973 book, Gravity’s Rainbow. I’ve never read it and I’m almost certain that Donald Trump hasn’t either.

Yet this seems to be the approach Donald Trump and his sycophants have been successfully using since he began his campaign for the presidency. Create distractions and diversions so that people are focusing on and discussing what he says and even how he says it, rather than what he is doing. We are asking the wrong questions, while he is getting away with not having to answer for all the wrong things he’s doing.


Written for the One-Liner Wednesday prompt from Linda G. Hill.

Fandango’s Provocative Question #17

FPQEach week I will pose what I think is a provocative question for your consideration. By provocative, I don’t mean a question that will cause annoyance or anger. Nor do I mean a question intended to arouse sexual desire or interest.

What I do mean is a question that is likely to get you to think, to be creative, and to provoke a response. Hopefully a positive response.

Earlier this week I wrote a post I called The Life and Death Paradox. It covered three rather provocative topics: abortion, sex education, and the death penalty. Not surprisingly, that post generated some very provocative comments. So that’s gonna be a tough act to follow.

This week’s provocative question came to mind when my son asked me a question. He wanted to know where we lived when I sold my motorcycle, and I couldn’t remember whether it was in New Jersey or Pennsylvania. I tried and tried, but came up empty. I couldn’t even recall the last time I rode it.

So, I decided to ask a question about human memory, which has been shown to be incredibly unreliable. With that in mind, here is this week’s provocative question:

“How do you know which of your memories are genuine and which have been altered over time or even made up?”

If you choose to participate, write a post with your response to the question. Once you are done, tag your post with #FPQ and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

And most important, have fun.

FOWC with Fandango — Percolate

FOWCWelcome to March 6, 2019 and to Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (aka, FOWC). It’s designed to fill the void after WordPress bailed on its daily one-word prompt.

I will be posting each day’s word just after midnight Pacific Time (US).

Today’s word is “percolate.”

Write a post using that word. It can be prose, poetry, fiction, non-fiction. It can be any length. It can be just a picture or a drawing if you want. No holds barred, so to speak.

Once you are done, tag your post with #FOWC and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

And be sure to read the posts of other bloggers who respond to this prompt. You will marvel at their creativity.