The Dream and the Reality

71a83a70-33b2-4e9c-89be-b9a98cf8220eI see myself in my dream as an accomplished writer, an author who has the ability to compose a truly great work of literature.

I can visualize, as I toil away on my keyboard, a flock of festive letters, like little, white snowflakes, floating up from my typewriter, transforming into magnificent words — nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and yes, even adverbs — and then slowly descending down to bedeck the blank pages of my book.

And then I wake up from the dream, sit down at my computer with a cup of hot coffee, and struggle to punch out enough words for a simple blog post.

There’s the dream and then there’s the reality.


Written for these one-word prompts: Fandago’s One-Word Challenge (compose), Scotts Daily Prompt, (literature), Your Daily Word Prompt (festive), Ragtag Daily Prompt (white), and Word of the Day Challenge (bedeck).

The Mask I Wear

This is the mask I wear when I wander the corridors of the blogosphere.

With it, I say what I feel deep down inside of me.

Without it, I say what people expect of me.

The true me, then, is the man behind the mask.

(Exactly 45 words)


D7A1540D-A4BE-4617-B8B4-681D7D3F0916Written for Sammi Cox’s Weekend Writing Prompt, where we are challenged to write a poem or piece of prose using the word “mask” in exactly 45 words.

SoCS — Rin Tin Tin

34DE33F6-1316-493E-AC93-6015B1AB2E3AFor this week’s Stream of Consciousness Saturday prompt, Linda G. Hill has asked us to use the word “tin” as a word or to find a word with “tin” in it, and to base our posts on that word.

I immediately recalled one of my favorite TV shows when I was a kid, “The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin.” It was an American television program that ran from 1954 through 1959. The show about a boy, Rusty, who was orphaned in an Indian raid and who was being raised by the soldiers at a U.S. Cavalry post known as Fort Apache. Rin Tin Tin was a German shepherd dog that helped the soldiers establish law and order in the American West.

Most episodes involved overcoming bad guys, often American Indians or white desperados. Whenever Rusty needed assistance from his trusty dog, he’d call out “Yo Rinty,” and Rin Tin Tin would run after and leap on the bad guy, pinning him down until the cavalrymen could arrive.

3F9DE41C-AF18-4D7A-A6E6-E8EAC6A378A2A contemporary of Rin Tin Tin, but a more popular TV show with a dog as its star, was “Lassie,” a “smart and fearless” collie. The show aired from 1954 through 1971. It followed Lassie’s adventures in a small farming community. Each week the dog’s young owner would find himself in some sort of trouble. Lassie would then run off and get help or rush in to save her master’s life herself. After being reunited with family, the boy would received a light lecture on why he should not have done what he had done.

I preferred Rin Tin Tin because I thought the whole Lassie thing was kind of lame. Rin Tin Tin, on the other hand, was a military dog apprehending bad guys, which to me was much more exciting than watching a dog save a kid who fell into a deep well at least once a month. Stupid kid.

Day 22 — Moving Forward

For today’s 30-Day Song Challenge we are asked for “a song that moves you forward.” As I thought about that prompt, I thought about transportation: a car, a train, a plane, a boat.

So for the second day in a row I’m going to tap into Jackson Browne, this time with his song “Running on Empty.”

With lyrics like these, this song is definitely about moving forward, or at least attempting to do so, even if you don’t know where moving forward will take you.

Looking out at the road rushing under my wheels
Looking back at the years gone by like so many summer fields
In sixty-five I was seventeen and running up one-o-one
I don’t know where I’m running now, I’m just running on

Running on – running on empty
Running on – running blind
Running on – running into the sun
But I’m running behind

Gotta do what you can just to keep your love alive
Trying not to confuse it with what you do to survive
In sixty-nine I was twenty-one and I called the road my own
I don’t know when that road turned onto the road I’m on

Running on – running on empty
Running on – running blind
Running on – running into the sun
But I’m running behind

Everyone I know, everywhere I go
People need some reason to believe
I don’t know about anyone but me
If it takes all night, that’ll be all right
If I can get you to smile before I leave

Looking out at the road rushing under my wheels
I don’t know how to tell you all just how crazy this life feels
I look around for the friends that I used to turn to to pull me through
Looking into their eyes I see them running too

Running on – running on empty
Running on – running blind
Running on – running into the sun
But I’m running behind

Honey you really tempt me
You know the way you look so kind
I’d love to stick around but I’m running behind
You know I don’t even know what I’m hoping to find
Running into the sun but I’m running behind

Fun fact: My then girlfriend — and now my wife — and I were in the audience at the concert at Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia, Maryland, on August 27, 1977 when this song, and the rest of the “Running on Empty” album, was recorded.

FOWC with Fandango — Compose

FOWCWelcome to December 22, 2018 and to Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (aka, FOWC). It’s designed to fill the void after WordPress bailed on its daily one-word prompt.

I will be posting each day’s word just after midnight Pacific Time (US).

Today’s word is “compose.”

Write a post using that word. It can be prose, poetry, fiction, non-fiction. It can be any length. It can be just a picture or a drawing if you want. No holds barred, so to speak.

Once you are done, tag your post with #FOWC and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

And be sure to read the posts of other bloggers who respond to this prompt. You will marvel at their creativity.