Finish the Story — The Penny

EC3A7CD3-B00F-41AE-A46D-68451DF5487FI seem to be being tagged a lot for Teresa’s Finish the Story prompts, which is fine because I enjoy them. This time it was Cheryl, aka, The Bag Lady, who tagged me.

So let’s start with what Teresa, The Haunted Wordsmith, wrote:

Sounds of children’s laughter and joy floated down the stairs. Liam breathed deeply and smiled. Never more content in his life. All thanks to the penny in his hand. 

“Don’t forget your change, sir,” she had said. Her smile ignited the flame he thought long dead. A brush of her hand against his, and he was hers. 

The ladies in his life, in beautiful red holiday dresses, walked down the steps of the opera house still reveling in The Nutcracker.

“Did you like it, Daddy?” Alice grinned. 

“Very much so.” He kissed Alice on the forehead, and held his wife’s hand.

The ringing of the Christmas bell called to the penny, and with a smile and tip of his hat, Liam dropped the penny into the kettle so that it may bring someone else as much love and joy as it had him.

“Thank you, sir and Merry Christmas.”

And here’s where Cheryl took over:

That evening as the Salvation Army Santa Claus emptied his kettle into the bank deposit box, he noticed one of the coins sparkled. He thought it was his tired eyes, playing a trick on him, but there it was, almost begging him to retrieve it. He hesitated only a second or two and then took the penny.

Retiring for the night where he now called home — a shelter for the homeless — he wearily sat down on the blanketed cot and eyed the coin once again. He hoped he wouldn’t be harshly judged by the Almighty for keeping this penny, for indeed it had called to him. Turning it over to read the mint mark and the year, he saw something scratched into the copper.

And now for my contribution:

Edgar donned his reading glasses hoping to better see the unusual etchings on the penny. He looked carefully, seeing that the engravings of the words “In God We Trust,” “Liberty,” and the date, “1955,” on the Lincoln side of the copper coin appeared to be blurry.9C458F82-4070-431F-AD7F-1DC201FDEB47Edgar became very excited, thinking that this penny might be worth way more than one cent. 

The next morning, Edgar went to a friend of his who was a coin collector. When the numismatist looked at the penny, he let out an audible gasp. “Oh my God, this is a 1955 doubled die obverse penny. Edgar, do you know what this means?”


How about if I hand this over to Sadje at Keep It Alive to take on Part 4. Remember, Sadje, to tag your post “FTS Penny” so that Teresa can find it.

8 thoughts on “Finish the Story — The Penny

  1. leigha66 November 25, 2018 / 4:29 pm

    I think coin and stamp collecting have all but ended with the younger generations. Good contribution to the story.

    Liked by 1 person

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