Stalker

3CB78D37-B12D-49B1-A0D1-EB073F441DFA“Well isn’t this a fine case of serendipity,” he said.

She turned around and looked at the man who was standing behind her on the balcony. “Excuse me?” she said.

“The two of us here, together and alone on this balcony,” he said. “I mean I know we’ve been glancing longingly at each other all night. And here we are.”

“I honestly don’t know what you’re talking about,” she said. “I’ve never seen you before in my life. And I certainly haven’t been glancing longingly at you.”

“Oh but you have,” he said. He pulled a small sketch tablet from his sport coat pocket and held it out for her to see. There were pencil sketches he’d drawn of her, not just tonight, but over the past several months. Each sketch had date and a caption written on it. “Together Forever” one said. “My One and Only” another caption read. “Meant To Be” a third one had written on it.

“Oh my God!” she screamed. “You’ve been stalking me!”

“No,” he said. “We are destined to be with one another. You might as well acquiesce to the inevitable.” Then he moved in to giver her a kiss, but before he could get to her, she put a jujitsu move on him.

She calmly took her phone out of her purse and punched in a few numbers. “9-1-1,” the operator said. “What’s your emergency?”

A man has fallen from the third floor balcony,” she said.


Written for these prompts: Ragtag Daily Prompt (serendipity), Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (balcony), Scotts Daily Prompt (tablet), Daily Addictions (caption), Your Daily Word Prompt (acquiesce), and Word of the Day Challenge (emergency).

Gods and Ghosts and Angels and Aliens

5AB8C8F1-E5E9-4DB7-8CFF-2CF30E83D251A blogger who I follow, like, and respect, Paula Light, over Light Motifs II, responded to this question yesterday in her Share Your World post: “What, in your opinion, makes people believe absurd conspiracy theories?”

Paula answered that it’s fear that makes people believe in conspiracy theories. She said, “People are scared of the unknown, of things they can’t control ~ natural disasters, crime, death, etc. ~ so they latch onto comforting explanations. Without this comfort, many people would not be able to function because life is fucking terrifying.”

Okay, I can understand latching on to “comforting explanations” and how a belief in God and in those comforting explanations that various religions offer can help people cope. I’m not sure I get the link between comforting explanations and absurd conspiracy theories, but that’s okay.

But it was what Paula wrote next that got my attention. She wrote:

“And for the atheists who like to mock those who believe in the supernatural, I have news for you: you also believe in bullshit, just different bullshit. Consider this. At any moment, you could die and die horribly, but you don’t think about that because you wouldn’t be able to get through the day. And what’s more, every time you leave the house, you trust that crazy medicated (or unmedicated!) other humans in their monster vehicles are going to obey the traffic laws. These are the same people who believe in gods and ghosts and angels and aliens. But you believe they’ll stop at the red lights. That’s nuts! But you believe it or you couldn’t leave the house.”

I’m sorry, Paula, but I have no idea what point you were trying to make with your tales about dying horribly or getting killed by a crazy, medicated or unmedicated driver who runs a red light. What does any of that have to do with absurd conspiracy theories or being an atheist?

I am an atheist, so let me explain something to those who don’t really know what an atheist is. Atheists don’t hate God or hate people who choose to believe in God. Also, being an atheist does not mean that we don’t believe in anything. We believe in a lot of things and a lot of different things.

Please understand that there is no “good book” that atheists embrace, no common mythology that atheists accept, no specific dogma to which atheists adhere. There is but one thing that all atheists have in common, and that is that we don’t believe that God exists. We believe that God is a human construct, and serves as that “comfortable explanation” that a lot of people use to help get them through their lives.

And personally speaking, I bear no ill will toward those who choose to believe in God. Well, except for those “believers” who tell me that I can’t be a moral person if I don’t believe in God, that I can’t distinguish between good and evil or right and wrong, and that I’m condemned to eternal damnation in hell — which I also don’t believe exists — if I don’t accept Jesus Christ as my personal lord and savior.

I bear a lot of ill will toward those who tell me such things.

Twittering Tales

AC46F0A9-43AF-4BA2-B5C2-D0CD2CBDF652I had hoped to make it until this Christmas. But my battery started draining too quickly and my human decided to trade me in for the latest model, which was just released a few weeks ago. I’ve been returned to this warehouse to be decommissioned and harvested for spare parts.

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Written for Kat Myrman’s Twittering Tales prompt. Photo credit: Buzz Anderson at Unsplash.com.

FOWC with Fandango — Balcony

FOWCWelcome to October 16, 2018 and to Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (aka, FOWC). It’s designed to fill the void after WordPress bailed on its daily one-word prompt.

I will be posting each day’s word just after midnight Pacific Time (US).

Today’s word is “balcony.”

Write a post using that word. It can be prose, poetry, fiction, non-fiction. It can be any length. It can be just a picture or a drawing if you want. No holds barred, so to speak.

Once you are done, tag your post with #FOWC and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

And be sure to read the posts of other bloggers who respond to this prompt. You will marvel at their creativity.