Sunday Photo Fiction — The Little Chapel

img_2256.jpgThe little chapel, with its ivy-covered vestibule, used to be open from dawn to dusk back in the day. From its very genesis, it was open to all who sought spiritual uplifting. Unfortunately, in recent years it had fallen upon hard times. The contributions that were used to keep the chapel afloat had dried up and the pastor was unable to pay the property taxes. He posted a declaration on the chapel’s door that it was up for sale.

Considerable opposition to the private sale of the little chapel was raised. Meetings were held where numerous speakers gave highly articulate speeches in support of the chapel. The pastor eloquently talked about the benefits the community derived from the little chapel and how money was needed to save the building from being sold to the highest bidder.

Despite their efforts, the pastor and the the other civic-minded members of the community were only able to raise meager sums. Ultimately the building was sold and converted into a private residence. But one of the provisions of the purchase and sale agreement was that the new owner could not remove the ivy around the vestibule and the cross on top.

(199 words)


Written for today’s Sunday Photo Fiction prompt from Susan Spaulding and for the following one-word prompts:

Photo Credit: John Brand

Sunday Writing Prompt — Going Back

img_2258When his kids asked Martin what he wanted to do for his 75th birthday, he said he wanted to go back to the town of his birth and to see the place he lived at when he was born and until his parents moved when he was ten years old. “It’s been 65 years since I last was there and it’s so full of childhood memories,” he told them. “I’d love to see it again before I die.”

Sally and Jacob purchased round trip plane tickets for the three of them to fly to their father’s hometown so that he could visit the place of his birth. As the day got closer, Martin grew more and more excited. He began speculating about what the apartment building his family lived in would be like today. Would it even still be there? What of the neighborhood he used to play in, the elementary school he attended?

The big day finally arrived and Martin could barely contain himself. After the plane landed, the trio rented a car and drove to the address Martin had given them. They pulled the car up to the address and got out of the car.

img_2257Martin gazed at the boarded up, abandoned building, a look of dismay on his face. His kids looked up at him expectantly and saw that tears had welled up in his eyes. “It’s a lot smaller than I remember,” he said.

“You were just a kid,” his daughter said. “Of course it looked bigger to you then than it does now.”

“I think Thomas Wolfe might have been right when he wrote, You Can’t Go Home Again,” Martin said. He looked around his childhood neighborhood and said, “Or maybe it should be that you shouldn’t go home again.”


Written for today’s Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie Sunday Writing Prompt. The idea is to craft a post in which you go from place to another.

Reblog: “A good story”

Richard Tilly’s post explains why it’s so much fun to participate in word and photo prompts and to take the time to read how others responded to the same prompts. It’s all about the stories.

Rtillyflash

A good story has nothing to do with the idea behind it.

It’s all down to the person who’s telling the story.

Give three people a simple idea and they will come up with three different stories.

So it’s not about who has the best idea for a story it’s about who’s the best storyteller.

That’s all that matters.


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Song Lyric Sunday — Other Plans

For this week’s Song Lyric Sunday, Helen Vahdati chose the theme “plan.” This was a tough one and I had to search my memory banks, but I finally came up with a song from Stevie Wonder’s 1972 album, Talking Book. The name of the song is “Maybe Your Baby.”

Talking Book was the fifteenth studio album by Stevie Wonder. The two biggest songs from that album were “You Are the Sunshine of My Life” and “Superstition.” “Maybe Your Baby” was not one of his more well known tracks from the album.

The song is the sad tale of a guy whose girl “done made some other plans” and is stepping out on him with his best friend. He feels betrayed, lost, down, and lonely. His dreams are turning to ashes and he doesn’t know how to cope.

Here are the song’s lyrics.

I’m feelin’ down and some kind of lonely,
Cause’ my baby done left me here,
Heart’s blazing like a five alarm fire
And I don’t even give a care

I feel like the world is turnin’ on me,
My dreams turnin’ to ashes right in front of my face,
And I’m gettin’ kind of worried,
And I feel so out of place,

Maybe your baby done made some other plans,
Maybe your baby done made some other plans

[Background] . . I feel like cryin’, yeh, yeh
Maybe baby, baby, baby, baby, baby

In the mornin’ when I’ve got heartache,
I can’t call up the doctor for help,
Cause’ the only person that could ever do me any good,
Is steppin’ out with my best friend

I feel like I’m slippin’ deeper,
Slippin’ deeper into myself,
And I can’t take it,
This stuff is scarin’ me to death

Maybe your baby done made some other plans,
Kinda makin’ me worried,
Maybe your baby done made some other plans

Little Sally Walker, sittin’ in a saucer,
Checkin’ out the guys that are passing by

[Background]…by, by, by, by…

Maybe your baby done made some other plans

Maybe your baby done made some other plans,
Not includin’ future plans,
Maybe your baby done made some other plans,
Maybe my baby done made some other plans,
Maybe my baby done made another plan
with another man.
Your baby, your baby, stupid baby, your baby,
That you put so trust so much trust in your baby,
Maybe your baby done made some other plans