Sunday Photo Fiction — The Job

img_1709“Are you sure this is the place?”

Eddie pulled a folded piece of paper out of his shirt pocket. “Yeah, Dwayne,” Eddie said as he read the address. “595 Canyon Road. It’s the right address.”

“This place looks like it’s been abandoned,” Dwayne said.

“This is the place,” Eddie insisted, bending down to tie his shoe lace.

“Well, okay, if you’re sure,” Dwayne said. “Hey, you got any chewing gum on you?”

Eddie grabbed a piece of gum and handed it to Dwayne. Both both men donned their rubber Richard Nixon masks and pulled out their pistols. “Let’s do this,” Dwayne said.

Eddie pushed open the rusty metal gate and the two of them climbed up onto what was once the front porch. Dwayne kicked open the door and they entered the large foyer.

The inside was a mess. There were cans, bottles, and empty cracker boxes strewn all over the floor. “What the fuck, Eddie?” Dwayne said. “This place is a pigsty. Call Horace and ask him what the deal is.”

Eddie pulled out his cellphone. “Horace, this is Eddie,” he said into the phone. “Dwayne and I are at 595 Canyon and…oh. 959 Canyon. Shit. I musta written it down wrong.”

(200 words)

Written for Susan’s Sunday Photo Fiction prompt and for Teresa’s Three Things Challenge, where the things are cracker, shoe, and chewing gum. Photo credit: C.E. Ayr


#FOWC — Double Life

90EEDBE3-DAE6-43D5-94B2-D0F9A0237235“What do you suspect happened here?” Detective Ron Hayden asked his partner, Detecitve Jim Morrisey.”

“I suspect foul play,” Morrisey said.

“So you don’t suspect it’s suicide?” Hayden asked. “It sure looks to me like suicide.”

“I suspect the scene was staged make it look like suicide, but I suspect the vic was murdered,” Morrisey said.

“Who do you suspect did it?” Hayden asked.

“I suspect it was her husband,” Morrisey answered. “The husband is always the most likely suspect.”

“Yeah, I suspect that’s true,” Hayden agreed.

“I looked into the suspect before we got here,” Morrisey said. “He’s suspected of having a different wife and kids one town over.”

“You mean he’s living a double life?” Hayden asked. “We need to bring him in for questioning.”

“I suspect our suspect has already skipped town,” Morrisey lamented.

I suspect you’re right,” Hayden agreed.


Written for today’s Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie Sunday Writing Prompt, which calls for us to write a detective story where someone in the story is leading a double life.

Also written for today’s Fandango’s One-Word Challenge, “suspect.”

Reblog: Cry for America: Cheers!

Well worth the read.

J.E.M. Wildfire

“I have reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro’s great stumbling block toward freedom is not the White citizen’s councilor or the Klu Klux Klanner, but the white moderate who is more devoted to order than justice; who prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension, to a positive peace, which is the presence of justice; who constantly says, ‘I agree with you with the goals that you seek, but can’t agree with your methods of direct action.” — the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., “Letter From Birmingham Jail,” 1963

Here’s to those who would replace “Black Lives Matter” with “white lives matter” or “all lives matter.” Here’s to those who call the police on unknown black men lingering in white coffee shops. Here’s to those who shrug and say “well, they thought he had a gun.” Here’s to those who say, “well, those illegals should…

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Song Lyric Sunday — The Carousel of Time

For this week’s Song Lyric Sunday theme, Helen Vahdati chose “game.” To be honest, last August, in response to a WordPress one-word prompt, “carousel,” I used the same song I’m using today. Joni Mitchell’s “The Circle Game.” I hope it’s okay for me to double-dip this song for your prompt, Helen.

Anyway, Joni Mitchell wrote this song for her third studio album, Ladies of the Canyon, which was released in March 1970 to critical acclaim. In the song, she tells the story of a child’s journey to adulthood. She uses a carousel as a metaphor for the years that go by, pointing out how we can look back, but we can’t return to our past.

The song opens with a young boy enjoying the wonder of youth, but looking forward to getting older. In the second verse, he is sixteen and driving. The final verse finds him at twenty, with his dreams tempered a bit, but still with high hopes for his future.

In an interview in 1994 for a music magazine, Mitchell said: “I didn’t write ‘The Circle Game’ as a children’s song, but I’m very pleased to see it go into the culture in that way.”

Although it was never a big hit, “The Circle Game” became one of Mitchell’s most popular songs.

Here are the song’s lyrics.

Yesterday a child came out to wonder
Caught a dragonfly inside a jar
Fearful when the sky was full of thunder
And tearful at the falling of a star

Then the child moved ten times round the seasons
Skated over ten clear frozen streams
Words like when you’re older must appease him
And promises of someday make his dreams

And the seasons they go round and round
And the painted ponies go up and down
We’re captive on the carousel of time
We can’t return we can only look
Behind from where we came
And go round and round and round
In the circle game 

Sixteen springs and sixteen summers gone now
Cartwheels turn to car wheels thru the town
And they tell him take your time it won’t be long now
Till you drag your feet to slow the circles down

And the seasons they go round and round
And the painted ponies go up and down
We’re captive on the carousel of time
We can’t return we can only look
Behind from where we came
And go round and round and round
In the circle game

So the years spin by and now the boy is twenty
Though his dreams have lost some grandeur coming true
There’ll be new dreams maybe better dreams and plenty
Before the last revolving year is through

And the seasons they go round and round
And the painted ponies go up and down
We’re captive on the carousel of time
We can’t return we can only look
Behind from where we came
And go round and round and round
In the circle game

FOWC with Fandango — Suspect

FOWCWelcome to the month of July. And a special thank you to those of you who encouraged me to continue this daily prompt when I was having my moment of doubt.

For the first Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (aka, FOWC) of the month, the word is “suspect.”

Write a post using that word. It can be prose, poetry, fiction, non-fiction. It can be any length. It can be just a picture or a drawing if you want. No holds barred, so to speak.

Once you are done, tag your post with #FOWC and create a pingback to this post if you are on WordPress. Or you can simply include a link to your post in the comments.

And be sure to read the posts of other bloggers who respond to this prompt. You will marvel at their creativity.