Symbolism

 

copy trade reg

When I first saw today’s one-word prompt, “trademark,” I started seeing those little symbols, like ©, ®, and ™, dancing around in my head. Yeah, I know. I’m weird.

I began to wonder when one uses one versus the others, so, of course, I Googled it. If you couldn’t care less about when to use ©, ®, or ™, or what they mean, you can stop reading now. I won’t be bothered. But if you are the least bit interested….

A trademark is a word, phrase, symbol, and/or design that identifies and distinguishes the source of the goods of one party from those of others. It alerts potential infringers that a term, slogan, logo, or other indicator is being claimed as a trademark. However, the use of TM does not guarantee the owner’s mark will be protected under trademark law.

A registered trademark, however, indicates that the trademark has been registered with the US Patent and Trademark Office. A registered trademark not only deters imitators, it also provides a heavy presumption of ownership in the courts. Woo hoo!

A copyright used with literary works, such as books, photographs, art work, and videos. It offers a person exclusive rights to reproduce, publish, or sell his or her original work of authorship.

How can I put this to practical use? Well, I suppose I could trademark the name of this blog: This, That, and The Other™ so that no one else can use that phrase without my persmission. And I could copyright the actual posts that I have written on this blog and then sue the shit out of anyone who uses my precious words.

Nah.

3 thoughts on “Symbolism

  1. Marilyn Armstrong October 24, 2017 / 10:13 am

    It’s not worth it. And really, you do not need to copyright books either, unless you are publishing internationally. The ownership of an original manuscript is considered a legal copyright. it’s a different matter when you get into actual inventions. That’s another kettle of fishies.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Fandango October 24, 2017 / 12:54 pm

      Good to know, not that I’m planning to publish anything other than my posts on WordPress.

      Like

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