SoCS — Do You See the Dew?

E1E0FEAD-5BA6-44E7-9051-764476758B21“Do you know exactly how much is due?” George asked his wife, Alicia, who was staring out of the kitchen window. When she didn’t respond, he said, “Earth to Alicia. Hello? Hello?”

“I’m sorry,” Alicia said. “Were you saying something?

“Yes, I was asking you a question, but you appear to be transfixed on something,” George said. “What are you looking at?”

“Oh George, come see this. It’s beautiful.”

Reluctantly, George got up from his desk and joined his wife at the kitchen window. “So, what’s so fascinating?”

“Do you see the dew on the grass?” Alicia asked. “The early morning sun is glinting off the dewdrops. It’s as if each blade of grass has tiny little crystalline pearls hanging on them.”

“Yeah, very pretty,” George said sarcastically. “But I gotta write a check to your dentist, so if you can take your eyes off of the dew, do you know how much is due?”


Written for today’s Stream of Consciousness Saturday prompt from Linda G. Hill. This week Dan Antion subbed for Linda, who is on a book-signing tour. The prompt for today is: “do/dew/due.” Use one, use two, or use all three.

6 thoughts on “SoCS — Do You See the Dew?

  1. Dan Antion September 30, 2017 / 4:09 am

    Very nice! I can picture this scene playing out in our kitchen. Yeah, yeah, we all have things to do, but look at this!

    Thanks for joining us and scooping up all the bonus points. ✔️☑️

    Liked by 2 people

    • Fandango September 30, 2017 / 8:46 am

      Thanks, Dan, for the great prompt. And, as you said, let’s hope Linda runs out of Sharpies.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Fandango September 30, 2017 / 8:49 am

      Do you think so? You’re making my eyes all dewy, thanks to the due you paid my post. 😜

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Marilyn Armstrong September 30, 2017 / 3:18 pm

    Gotta love English … all our words that sound alike but are so very different. But confuse the hell out of new speakers.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Fandango September 30, 2017 / 3:40 pm

      There’s even a name for such words. They’re called homophones.

      Like

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