Where Have I Seen This Before?

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I admit that I’ve only watched the phenomenon known as “Doctor Who” once in my life, and that was years ago when my son, now a fully grown man, insisted that I watch what he described as an amazing TV show he had just discovered.

“Doctor Who” is a British science-fiction television show about the adventures of someone called “The Doctor,” an extraterrestrial being. The Doctor explores the universe in a time-traveling spaceship that resembled a British police box, which was common in Britain when the series first aired in 1963.

Much to my son’s disappointment, I wasn’t at all impressed with the program. I thought it was kind of cheesy.

And seriously, a spaceship that looks like a phone booth? Everyone knows that this is what a real spaceship looks like:

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Not like this:

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Although I only saw the show that one time, and that was 20 or so years ago, I immediately recognized the photo prompt as Doctor Who’s spaceship.

I texted the picture to my son and told him I was going to write a post about it, thinking he’d be excited.

Instead, he texted me back and said, “Dad, you really need to get a life.”

(199 words)


Written for Sunday Photo Fiction. Listen, I know this is supposed to be fiction, and this post is non-fiction, but I was inspired to write about the photo, and isn’t that the whole point?

Photo credit: A Mixed Bag 

An Organized Mind

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I used to work for a guy whose desk was always a mess. I am not exactly a neat-freak, but I always tried to keep a reasonably tidy desk. Having papers and crap randomly spread out on my desk made me feel anxious, so keeping it relatively clean helped me maintain my sanity in what was often a chaotic work environment.

I used to dread it when I had to walk into my boss’s office and ask him for something. He would rifle through papers and folders that were scattered across his large desk for maybe five minutes before he’d finally locate whatever files or papers I had asked for.

When I commented on his disorganization, he would quip, “A messy desk is a sign of an organized mind.”

“No,” I would think to myself, not daring to say it out loud to my boss, “a messy desk is a sign of a messy desk.” I encouraged him to take some time to organize his desk. I even volunteered to help him organize his files. But he always claimed to know exactly where everything on his mess of a desk was located.

But this tale has a happy ending. My messy boss was ultimately let go and I was promoted to take his place. So while he believed that  a messy desk is a sign of an organized mind, I learned that a messy desk is a promotion opportunity for someone with an organized desk (and mind.)


Written for today’s one-word prompt, “organize.”

SoCS — Squishy Words

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There are certain words in the English language that I consider to be “squishy.” Words like “suppose,” or “think,” or “believe.” All three of these words denote (or is it connote?) uncertainty.

For example,

  • I suppose I can get there in time.
  • I think I can get there in time.
  • I believe I can get there in time.

The problem with these squishy words is that, in each case, I don’t know if I can get there in time. I can try to get there in time, but I can’t be certain.

But the squishiest word of them all is “guess.”

People know they’re being squishy because of the way they wrap the word “guess” up. They may say, “Well, if I had to guess….” No, you don’t have to guess. No one is putting a gun to your head and forcing you to guess at something.

Or maybe they’ll offer to “hazard a guess.” That means they’re taking a risk, perhaps even a dangerous one, that they may be wrong about what it is they’re guessing.

Even an “educated guess” is still just a guess. Presumably the person who makes an educated guess knows something about the topic on which he or she is making the guess. But while an “educated guess” may reduce the possibility that the guess is wrong, it doesn’t guarantee that it’s right.

I admit to being guilty of using the words “guess,” “suppose,” “think,” and “believe” all the time. But when I ask someone a question and that person is not sure of the answer, I’d prefer to be told “I don’t know” instead of “I guess.”

And with that said, I believe I have covered this topic sufficiently, although I suppose I could provide some more examples. No, I think I’ve said enough.

I guess.


Written for today’s Stream of Consciousness Saturday prompt from Linda G. Hill, which is to write a post using or about the word “guess.”